Problem with Resolution/DPI

Engaged ,
Jun 10, 2022 Jun 10, 2022

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I've been working on a book that includes many pictures. I set my images up in Photoshp with a resolution of 300 pixels/inch. That correlates with 300 dpi, right?

The person I hired to format my book says the images must be 300 dpi. I checked and discovered that most of them are 72 dpi. She said I can "optimisze" them in Photoshop.

So I have two questions ...

First, why aren't my images saving as 300 dpi to begin with?

Second, how do I optimize them? I can open a 72 dpi image, copy and paste it into a new file, then change the image size to a resolution of 300, but it's of no use if it's just going to save is as a 72 dpi image.

Thanks.

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Adobe Community Professional , Jun 10, 2022 Jun 10, 2022

Additionally to the great advice offered by Jane and Bojan, I'd also add that using the Export option will strip out and remove any resolution metadata, while using Save As a Copy will retain the resolution metdata.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 10, 2022 Jun 10, 2022

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@Geobop wrote:

I set my images up in Photoshp with a resolution of 300 pixels/inch. That correlates with 300 dpi, right?

 

Pixels Per Inch is actually PPI, not Dots (of ink) Per Inch which is ink on paper.

 

  • Can you tell us the width and height of your image in pixels? Is 6000 px x 6000 px or 500 px x 500 px, for example?
  • What is the file format — PSD? TIFF? JPEG?
  • How are you saving the image?
  • Are you working on a copy or the original?

 

Jane

 

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Engaged ,
Jun 10, 2022 Jun 10, 2022

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Most of my images are 1,000 pixels wide. Images that are meant to span half a page are often 500 pixels wide, while tiny images can be smaller. The heights vary.

I'm working with Photoshop (PSD), but most of my iamges are saved as jpeg or png.

To save an image, I choose File > Export > Quick Export as PNG or File > Export > Export As > JPG.

By original, I assume you mean Photoshop file, while "copy" means saved image, right?

I'd like to know how to process both, but right now I'm trying to optimize a folder full of images with .jpg or .png extensions.

Thanks.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 10, 2022 Jun 10, 2022

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Additionally to the great advice offered by Jane and Bojan, I'd also add that using the Export option will strip out and remove any resolution metadata, while using Save As a Copy will retain the resolution metdata.

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Engaged ,
Jun 10, 2022 Jun 10, 2022

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Ah, so that's the root of the problem - I should have been saving as a copy instead of exporting. Thanks.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 13, 2022 Jun 13, 2022

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IF an image is 1000 pixels wide and to be printed at 300ppi, (not DPI, which is something entirely different) then your image will print just over 3" wide, that's not a page width unless the printed item is tiny. Seems to me like you may need a larger image size policy?

 

Stephen is right "save As" is a better option than Export. Do make sure that 'embed ICC profile' is checked 

 

I hope this helps
neil barstow, colourmanagement net :: adobe forum volunteer:: co-author: 'getting colour right'
google me "neil barstow colourmanagement" for lots of free articles on colour management

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Engaged ,
Jun 13, 2022 Jun 13, 2022

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If I choose "Save as" it may or may not give me the option of saving it as a jpg. So I've been selecting "Save a Copy" instead.

I don't see any reference to  "embed ICC profile." I do see a box that says "Embed Color Profile: sRGB IEC51966-2.1." It's checked by default on some images but not on others.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 13, 2022 Jun 13, 2022

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Jpeg will appear in Save As if the file already satisfies the jpeg specification - 8 bit, no layers, no transparency and no alpha channels. Otherwise you need to Save A Copy.

 

Save will embed the profile by default. With Export/Save For Web you may need to check the box manually.

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Engaged ,
Jun 13, 2022 Jun 13, 2022

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What about images that I saved without checking the box? Will they be lower quality?

Also, I just saw something on the internet about saving images a particular way if you want to use them in InDesign. In fact, I'm just learning how to use InDesign. Do images have to be saved in a particular format to prevent InDesign from rejecting them?

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 13, 2022 Jun 13, 2022

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If you save without a profile there is nothing to tell the application how to display the numbers. The profile defines the numbers as specific colors and tones.

 

The simple remedy is to assign the right profile. If you know what it's supposed to be, just assign that. If you don't, assign the profile that looks right. This profile should then follow the file wherever it travels.

 

InDesign will accept any standard file format from Photoshop.

 

 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 16, 2022 Jun 16, 2022

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You wrote: "I don't see any reference to  "embed ICC profile." I do see a box that says "Embed Color Profile: sRGB IEC51966-2.1."

Yep that’s the exact wording "Embed Color Profile: - - - "

 

I hope this helps
neil barstow, colourmanagement net :: adobe forum volunteer:: co-author: 'getting colour right'
google me "neil barstow colourmanagement" for lots of free articles on colour management

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 10, 2022 Jun 10, 2022

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If you have 1000px wide images that means that images can print as 3,3 inch wide at resolution 300ppi. Is that enough? 500 pixels printed on paper with print resolution 300 means image will be printed at 1,7 inch phisycal size, is that enough? If not then you must enlarge existing images what will result with quality loss or look for original images and crop them according to final destination needs.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 13, 2022 Jun 13, 2022

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Hi @Geobop, You write, "Most of my images are 1,000 pixels wide." As you've been advised already, this size could be too small for printing if the images are only 72 dpi. Do you know where the original images are? Were they taken with a professional digital camera? Are they scans of prints? From a third-party (i.e., online) source? If you can get back to the original files to see if they are larger, that would be the best solution. However, if the 1,000 pixels wide, 72 ppi images are all you have to work with, enlarging the images will take some careful consideration. Also, be aware you will lose quality (some data will be lost) every time you save images as JPGs.

 

Open your images in Photoshop and bring up the Image Size dialogue box. Look at the size, both in pixels and in inches. Figure out how large the images need to be on the pages in your book. Then, size them accordingly, making sure they are 300 Pixels/Inch. As an example, I could print this image at 100 percent up to 6x5 inches. Make sense?

 

JainLemos_1-1655142827850.png

 

JainLemos_0-1655142591952.png

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 13, 2022 Jun 13, 2022

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 13, 2022 Jun 13, 2022

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The ppi number determines the print size, given the number of pixels you have in the file.

 

Ppi is probably the most misunderstood concept in all of digital imaging. But it's really simple. It means exactly what it says: pixels per inch. There's no hidden meaning.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 13, 2022 Jun 13, 2022

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quote

I've been working on a book that includes many pictures. I set my images up in Photoshp with a resolution of 300 pixels/inch. That correlates with 300 dpi, right?


By @Geobop

 

I keep having to resurrect this very old (24 years old) article but heck, it still applies today, decades after it was first written as nothing has changed:

http://digitaldog.net/files/Resolution.pdf

Work in pixels.


Author “Color Management for Photographers" & "Photoshop CC Color Management/pluralsight"

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