Calibrated Laptop Monitor not showing the correct colors in Photoshop

Explorer ,
Nov 24, 2016 Nov 24, 2016

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Hi, I am a photographer and photo editor.  I recently purchased an Xrite i1Display pro to Calibrate my laptop screen.  I have an Acer V15 Nitro. 

Once calibrated and a new profile was created, everything on my laptop looked great.  However, once I opened up an image in Photoshop and Lightroom, I noticed the image appeared way more saturated, and had a pinkish tone to the image.  The same effect shows when I open it up in Windows photo, but when I use a program like Irfanview, the image looks correct as calibrated. 

I've done some search on this topic but a lot of the responses don't really answer my question, which is this:

Is there any way I can have Photoshop and Lightroom show the correctly calibrated colors on my laptop screen so I can edit them properly?

If not, then it seems like there's no way I will be able to use the calibrated profiles since the colors are too off in photoshop for me to edit them. 

Would a better option to buy a separate monitor that already comes pre-calibrated?

I'm basically just looking to get calibrated colors that can be viewed across all programs.

Thanks in advance.

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correct answers 1 Correct Answer

Explorer , Feb 21, 2021 Feb 21, 2021
Got a random notification about this thread that I pretty much forgot I started years ago.  In case anyone is wondering what happened since; I had that laptop sent in to be looked at by experts and it was determined that the display panel itself was the issue.  I don't recall whether it was because the display itself had a very narrow sRGB gamut but something was off with it.  Since then, I've gone through a couple of newer laptops and external monitors and have never had this issue again.  Curr...

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 24, 2016 Nov 24, 2016

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That laptop seems to have a wide gamut display, their website states "100% Adobe RGB". That changes the ordinary rules a bit, and the most important implication is that these displays can only be used in a fully color managed environment​,​ such as Photoshop and Lightroom.

Applications that don't support color management will never display correctly on such a display, except occasionally by pure accident (if the file is created in Adobe RGB and has Adobe RGB numbers).

Wide gamut displays must be calibrated and profiled. The i1 Display Pro is the best third-party option currently on the market for this.

You need to realize that calibration and display profile are two different things. People usually mix them up, probably because the calibration correction tables are often stored inside the profile for convenience. But the two serve different purposes.

The calibration is just a simple, low-precision, linear adjustment to the display's response. It affects everything globally, but is not part of the color management chain.

The display profile is a high-precision, three-dimensional description of the display's characteristics in its calibrated state. It is used by color managed applications only, in a standard profile conversion from document to display. This conversion is performed by the application on the fly, and the result sent to the display.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 24, 2016 Nov 24, 2016

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Have a look at this straight-forward online video tutorial from Lynda.com: InDesign Insider Training: Color Management

(it includes Photoshop)

You can get a 10-day free trial.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 24, 2016 Nov 24, 2016

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And to answer your questions specifically:

Is there any way I can have Photoshop and Lightroom show the correctly calibrated colors on my laptop screen so I can edit them properly?

They will, using the display profile created by the x-rite software, as long as that profile correctly describes the display's actual behavior. Other non-color managed applications will not.

Would a better option to buy a separate monitor that already comes pre-calibrated?

Yes, but not because it's "pre-calibrated". The i1 Display Pro will make a much more accurate profile. However, laptop displays are normally no match for a good desktop monitor.

I'm basically just looking to get calibrated colors that can be viewed across all programs.

That will never happen, and especially not with a wide gamut display. There will always be a difference between color managed applications and non-color managed ones. The former is right, the latter is wrong. The difference is usually small enough to often go unnoticed, but a wide gamut display makes the difference very obvious and impossible to ignore. The color managed version is still the right one.

EDIT to note: It might be worth checking that your x-rite profile hasn't been overwritten by a laptop manufacturer profile distributed through Windows Update. That can happen (and these profiles are often broken). Under Control Panel > Color Management > Devices, the x-rite profile should be the one marked (default).

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Explorer ,
Nov 28, 2016 Nov 28, 2016

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Thanks for taking the time to respond to my question. 

So I'm still having issues with how my Xrite calibrated monitor profile is being viewed in photoshop/lightroom:

Below is an example of what I mean by the images come up to pink:

Screen_Comparison.jpg

Every picture I load into photoshop/lightroom now has a significant pink/red tone to it. 

I have tried numerous different settings with including changing the white point and luminance from native to D65, 120cd/m.

I've changed settings from White LED to Wide Gamut CCFL to Generic.  None of these have worked to solve the issue.

I even contacted Xrite directly but the suggestions they gave have not helped either (They had me load a default non-linear profile before calibrating but that didn't fix anything).

At this point, is the problem still with Photoshop/Lightroom or is the issue with my computer monitor?  I'm starting to think it's the latter.

Any feedback is appreciated.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 29, 2016 Nov 29, 2016

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I took another look at your screenshot, and which one is correct is impossible to say. It looks like the normal and expected difference between color managed display and non-color managed display. Which application, precisely, are you using outside Photoshop?

My problem here is that I don't know what type of screen this laptop has, so I can't tell which way this difference should go. You need to find that out. If it was a desktop monitor I could figure it out myself, but laptops usually have configurable options.

You also need to find out which of your applications are color managed and which are not. You cannot trust those that are not, they are wrong. Most Adobe apps are color managed, many other photo viewers are not.

There is never an "issue with the monitor". What can happen is that the monitor profile doesn't correctly describe that monitor. Then on-screen display will be wrong in color managed apps, while non-color managed ones are unaffected, for the simple reason that they don't use the profile anyway.

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Explorer ,
Nov 29, 2016 Nov 29, 2016

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Ok, so the point I was trying to make with that screenshot was not whether one looks "better" than the other, but to point out the fact that everything I open in 'Photoshop or Lightroom turns out redder/pinker than it's suppose to be.  Let me give you another example that better illustrates this.

screen2.jpg

In this one, you can easily see a major shift towards redder/pinker skin tones than the original. 

So if Photoshop/Lightroom are suppose to be color managed, why are the tones so off compared to what they are suppose to look like?  Are there any special settings in photoshop/lightroom I need to change?  The disparity in color between the color managed and non color managed applications is very significant.  I just compared it to a friend who uses a calibrated Macbook Pro and the difference in color is not nearly as significant as mine.  In this case, is it pretty much pointless for me to use any calibration for this particular monitor?  It seems that any calibration I do throws off the color so much in Photoshop that I am unable to do any sort of color accurate work in it.

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Guide ,
Nov 29, 2016 Nov 29, 2016

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What profile is assigned to your images? It could be that you're assigning AdobeRGB to images that are closer to sRGB. That would generally make them appear redder.

Could you try showing us the same screenshot with this file?

PDI_Target_AdobeRGB.jpg photo - Gul Chotrani photos at pbase.com

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Guide ,
Nov 29, 2016 Nov 29, 2016

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Also, bear in mind that unless your monitor profile is assigned to your screenshot, we can't see what you see. I also think the bottom image looks subjectively better. The top one has a green cast that may or may not be intended.

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Explorer ,
Nov 29, 2016 Nov 29, 2016

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I know for a fact that the top images for both of the screenshots I sent are the "correct" colored images as I verified them with a calibrated iMac that I have at work. 

When I use the monitor profile created by Xrite, the reddish/pinkish cast appears in Photoshop/Lightroom/and Windows Photo Viewer.

When I use a program like IrFanView or view the image on a browser like Chrome, the picture appears correct without the color cast.

I have also tried calibrating the screen using ICC2 (as opposed to ICC4) and there is no improvement either.

I just used a program to pull up my monitor, these are the specs:

Monitor

  Windows description...... Generic PnP Monitor

  Manufacturer............. LG Display

  Plug and Play ID......... LGD0443

  Data string.............. LP156WF4-SPK1

  Serial number............ n/a

  Manufacture date......... 2013, ISO week 0

  Filter driver............ None

  -------------------------

  EDID revision............ 1.4

  Input signal type........ Digital (DisplayPort)

  Color bit depth.......... 6 bits per primary color

  Color encoding formats... RGB 4:4:4, YCrCb 4:4:4

  Screen size.............. 350 x 190 mm (15.7 in)

  Power management......... Standby, Suspend, Active off/sleep

  Extension blocs.......... None

  -------------------------

  DDC/CI................... n/a

Color characteristics

  Default color space...... Non-sRGB

  Display gamma............ 2.20

  Red chromaticity......... Rx 0.635 - Ry 0.345

  Green chromaticity....... Gx 0.335 - Gy 0.623

  Blue chromaticity........ Bx 0.150 - By 0.052

  White point (default).... Wx 0.313 - Wy 0.329

  Additional descriptors... None

Timing characteristics

  Range limits............. Not available

  GTF standard............. Not supported

  Additional descriptors... None

  Preferred timing......... Yes

  Native/preferred timing.. 1920x1080p at 60Hz (16:9)

    Modeline............... "1920x1080" 138.700 1920 1968 2000 2080 1080 1083 1088 1111 -hsync -vsync

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 28, 2016 Nov 28, 2016

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Judged by the screenshot here, the Photoshop version looks healthier.

I'll look more closely at this later, but just to get it established right away: you should not, and can not, expect color managed and non-color managed applications to display identically. They never will, and they're not supposed to.

If two color managed applications disagree, however, something's wrong.

So what are you comparing to?

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 29, 2016 Nov 29, 2016

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Again: you need to disregard applications that are not color managed. OK? Are we clear on that? Throw them out and bury them for now. They are irrelevant and wrong regardless.

So the next question is to find out if there is a problem with the display profile made by i1 Profiler. That could well be, but we need firm ground to stand on. This is where it would be extremely useful to know what type of display your laptop has.

Standard profile trouble-shooting is to temporarily replace the profile with a known good one. That would be sRGB for a standard gamut display, or Adobe RGB for a wide gamut one - but there are exceptions. Some laptop displays have smaller gamuts than sRGB, and in that case your screenshot is what it would look like.

So if you still can't figure out what display you have - try both. I don't know which one.

Go into Windows Control Panel > Color Management > Devices. Relaunch Photoshop when done because it needs to load the new profile at startup:

Displayprofile_1.png

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 29, 2016 Nov 29, 2016

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The panel specs indicate standard gamut, which is consistent with your screenshot. Then everything in fact behaves in the normal and expected way.

The Acer website says it's wide gamut, or at least that this is available. That's what threw me off at first.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 29, 2016 Nov 29, 2016

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Here's my theory so far:

This laptop has a standard gamut display, but with a gamut a little smaller than sRGB. This is quite common in laptop displays, and usually it's the red primary that doesn't extend to the sRGB red primary. It's a little less saturated.

In Photoshop, and all other color managed apps, the colors are remapped into the display profile so that everything reproduces correctly. You'll just hit red clipping a little sooner.

In nonmanaged apps no such remapping happens, and the document RGB values are just distributed over this narrower range. The net result is lower red saturation on screen.

Your friend's iMac has a display that matches sRGB much better, so you won't see that much difference. But in fact the Photoshop versions will be similar - it's just the direct comparison that fools you into thinking you have more red on your end.

In short - there is nothing wrong here. This is the expected behavior. And a nice way to illustrate what color management does.

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Explorer ,
Nov 29, 2016 Nov 29, 2016

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Ok I've attached a few more screenshots where I compare the image Danny linked using sRGB, Adobe, RGB, and the Monitor Profile created by Xrite after calibration.

Ex 1: Monitor set to default sRGB profile.  Top half shows image viewed in non-color managed application (irfanview).

Bottom half shows image viewed in Photoshop:

121510930.vF9tiUe3.PDI_Target_AdobeRGB_srgb.jpg

Ex 2: Monitor set to default Adobe RGB profile.  Top half shows image viewed in non-color managed application (irfanview).

Bottom half shows image viewed in Photoshop:

121510930.vF9tiUe3.PDI_Target_AdobeRGB_adobergb.jpg

Ex 3: Monitor set to Calibrated Profile generated through Xrite i1Display

Top half shows image viewed in non-color managed application (irfanview).

Bottom half shows image viewed in Photoshop:

121510930.vF9tiUe3.PDI_Target_AdobeRGB_edited_2.jpg

Once again the calibrated profile created by Xrite creates a red/pink cast when images are viewed in photoshop.

I tried recalibrating and creating a new profile a couple more times and the results are the same.

D Fosse,

Going by your theory, if this is the expected behavior of the monitor, then it looks like editing with photoshop is not going to work with this calibrated profile.  I can't work on a image when its colors are significantly skewed in photoshop.  In this situation, I think it would be better to just not use any calibration at all.  Or just buy a monitor dedicated to this.  Thoughts?

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Guide ,
Nov 30, 2016 Nov 30, 2016

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murdoc16 wrote:

Going by your theory, if this is the expected behavior of the monitor, then it looks like editing with photoshop is not going to work with this calibrated profile. I can't work on a image when its colors are significantly skewed in photoshop. In this situation, I think it would be better to just not use any calibration at all. Or just buy a monitor dedicated to this. Thoughts?

No, no, no, no, no.

The screenshots you've provided show your display after changing to different monitor profiles, is that correct? It's the profile assigned to your images that I think might be wrong. In all your screenshots, it's the bottom halves that have the correct RGB values.

Set your monitor profile back to the one generated by Xrite. Then open the image in Photoshop and go to Edit > Assign Profile. What is assigned? AdobeRGB? If so, try assigning sRGB and see it looks more like you think it should.

D Fosse has expained the system well, but it does seem a little like your bias towards blaming Adobe and Xrite, and using what we know for sure to be wrong (unmanaged software) as a reference, are getting in the way of that sinking in.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 30, 2016 Nov 30, 2016

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That's what I have been saying all along, but it doesn't sink in..murdoc16, like so many others, seems to think that the standard un-managed photo viewers show the "original", "unmodified", perhaps even "pure" version of the file. This happens all the time.

Why this misconception? I don't know. Familiarity, maybe. In any case, they all insist this is the "correct" version.

However, an unmanaged version is useful for comparing and demonstrating exactly how the two differ. That's what I want now.

So, murdoc16, color management was invented to solve a problem. The problem is that images don't display correctly without it. Are we clear on that? Just say yes. So a color managed and a not-color managed version will always be different. They will not, shall not, and are not supposed to match. Ever. One is right because it is corrected, and the other is wrong because it is uncorrected.

But before we can move on I want to see those two screenshots I just requested.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 30, 2016 Nov 30, 2016

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D Fosse wrote:

........seems to think that the standard un-managed photo viewers show the "original", "unmodified", perhaps even "pure" version of the file. This happens all the time.

Why this misconception? I don't know.

I think part of the problem that leads to that misconception is that most display ICC files contain the calibration data and the profile. Users see the screen change when the calibration data is loaded by Windows to the video LUT, shortly after windows starts,  and then they assume that the profile is also being used by all their apps.

Dave

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 30, 2016 Nov 30, 2016

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Yes, that's a good point. If these were totally separate processes, procedurally as well as functionally, the difference between profile and calibration would have been much easier to get across. As it is, people mix them up, and perhaps that's understandable.

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Explorer ,
Nov 30, 2016 Nov 30, 2016

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Ok, so I've taken screenshots of the 2 images you requested.

The first using the Default sRGB monitor profile:

SRGB Capture.jpg

The second using the Xrite generated profile:

Xrite Profile Capture.jpg

And here's the color settings that I use in photoshop (if it matters):

Photoshop color settings.jpg

So I understand the concept of color management.  So my question again is, why is it that photoshop keeps showing the images with a red color cast when I use the Xrite generated profile.  I have had friends open up this same file in photoshop using a Calibrated Macbook Pro, calibrated iMac, and a calibrated high end NEC monitor and none of them show this red color cast that I'm seeing on my laptop.  I am unable to do any sort of editing work in photoshop if it keeps showing this red cast on every image I open up when I'm using the Xrite generated profile. 

Thanks.

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Explorer ,
Nov 30, 2016 Nov 30, 2016

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Danny,

So I followed your instructions.

I set my monitor profile to the one generated by Xrite.

I opened up the image in photoshop

I went to assign profile,it was currently under Adobe RGB

Then I clicked to assign the profile to sRGB.  The results were slightly better but the image still had a pinkish cast to it.

Then I chose to assign the Xrite generated monitor profile and the results were much better and true to color.

With that, is this what I would have to do in order for photoshop to show the accurate colors?  Assign the color profile of each image to the one matching my monitor (the generated Xrite profile)?

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 30, 2016 Nov 30, 2016

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Murdoc16, I really need to be blunt here: you're still not getting it, even after repeated attempts to explain how this works. You need to listen to what we're saying!

Then I chose to assign the Xrite generated monitor profile and the results were much better and true to color.

What this is doing, is to disable the display color management chain. The whole thing is null and void, and you're back to square one.

And yet you still insist that this is "true to color". How many times do we need to repeat this? A color managed display chain remaps from the document profile into the display profile, and these altered RGB values are sent to the display. This is done to correct for the display, so that the file is truthfully represented on screen.

An application without color management doesn't do this, and the file RGB numbers are sent directly, unaltered to the display.

Do you understand this difference? We don't seem to get past this hurdle.

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Explorer ,
Dec 01, 2016 Dec 01, 2016

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D Fosse,

I attached the screen shots per your request in the previous post and my question still isn't answered. 

Secondly, I think you are taking my words too literally, when I say true to color.  I mean it isn't showing the pink cast that the other profile's are showing.

Again my question is:

What is the cause for the excessive reddish tone for when I open up the images in photoshop and is there anything I can do about it?  I have attached the sRGB and the Xrite profile screen shots in the previous post yesterday.

Is it cause of Photoshop, Xrite, or my Monitor?

I cannot work/edit with images that show significantly reddish images in photoshop.  So if the cause of this isn't Xrite or Photoshop.  And if there's nothing else I can do about it, then the only logical cause remaining would be my monitor, is that correct?

In that case I would need to get a better monitor.

Looking for a straightforward answer to this, I am looking for practical application of this Xrite calibration.  Even if you say the red colors I see in photoshop are correct because of the way my monitor is, then I simply cannot use the monitor as a result of this red cast and would probably be best served to get a external monitor.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Dec 02, 2016 Dec 02, 2016

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OK. Based on what I know and have seen so far, it looks like a broken/defective x-rite profile.

The thing is, if I had this laptop in front of me I could figure this out in fifteen seconds. But I don't, and so I need you to help me out. To do that, we need to be on the same page. I need to know that you understand the basic principles that are at work here - if not, we'll just waste time chasing one red herring after another.

Assuming both those two screenshots have sRGB as document profile (the profile isn't embedded in the files posted here) - and the display profile was changed in Windows Color Management, and Photoshop was relaunched after this switch - a broken profile is what it looks like.

This is clearly not a wide gamut display. If it was, it would be the other way round, Photoshop being less saturated. So either this display has a very narrow gamut, much narrower than sRGB - some laptop displays actually do, so I need to make a reservation for this. That would explain it fully.

I haven't used i1 Profiler for some time (I bought it just for the sensor, which is the best on the market). But you need to run this again, and reexamine all the settings. Go into the advanced section.

  • again, set it to version 2 and table-based profiles. Not version 4 or table-based.
  • reduce the number of patches to minimum. You'd think the more the better, but this calls for excessively detailed corrections that complicates things unnecessarily.
  • set white point to native. Laptop displays tend to have the strangest white points, again complicating things.
  • set display type to WLED (white LED).

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Dec 02, 2016 Dec 02, 2016

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Assuming both those two screenshots have sRGB as document profile (the profile isn't embedded in the files posted here) - and the display profile was changed in Windows Color Management, and Photoshop was relaunched after this switch - a broken profile

Dag - by the label on the screen image it looks like those last two screenshots are an image with Adobe RGB as doc profile

  • again, set it to version 2 and table-based profiles. Not version 4 or table-based.

Should that have said matrix based?

Dave

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