Highlighted

How to give my photo a 'flattened' effect

New Here ,
Oct 05, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

hey yall, 

im looking to 'flatten' my images (not the layers) in my photos. 

My images show so much detail shooting in RAW; it's too realistic. I'm looking for some way to have a more flattened, or scanned, look to my images. Any suggestions?

 

TOPICS
How to

Views

140

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more

How to give my photo a 'flattened' effect

New Here ,
Oct 05, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

hey yall, 

im looking to 'flatten' my images (not the layers) in my photos. 

My images show so much detail shooting in RAW; it's too realistic. I'm looking for some way to have a more flattened, or scanned, look to my images. Any suggestions?

 

TOPICS
How to

Views

141

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Oct 05, 2020 0
Most Valuable Participant ,
Oct 06, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

You first and foremost need to adjust the Gamma, i.e. mess around with the curves/ grey point levels. Compressing the mid ranges drastically reduces the overall contrast. Of course you may need to tweak the colors, also. "Flat" images often appear that way due to not ideal white and black point settings during their capture and the necessary color correction thereafter further reducing the color fidelity.

 

Mylenium

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Oct 06, 2020 2
LEGEND ,
Oct 06, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Could you post examples of what you have and what you want to achieve? 

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Oct 06, 2020 1
Adobe Community Professional ,
Oct 06, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

It's much easier for us to help you if you post:

1: your image

2: a link to an example you’ve found which has the kind of appearance you'd like

 

I hope this helps

thanks
neil barstow, colourmanagement.net :: adobe forum volunteer
[please do not use the reply button on a message within the thread, only use the blue reply button at the top of the page, this maintains the original thread title and chronological order of posts]

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Oct 06, 2020 1
New Here ,
Oct 06, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

hey all, thanks for the tips!

attached is the first image, unedited. in the second i have scanned it in, and what i like about the scan is the flatness of the image. even when i color correct and adjust tones, the image still has a flatness to it that i love. any suggestions without the scanner as i am on the move and cant bring that bad boy with me all the time? test1.JPGOKM_scantest_1 small.jpg

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Oct 06, 2020 0
LEGEND ,
Oct 06, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Screenshot 2020-10-06 at 17.27.33.png

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Oct 06, 2020 1
New Here ,
Oct 06, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

sorry im confused by this!  are you adjusting curves in the scanned photo? im trying to recreate the flatness of the scanned photo on the original, unscanned photo 

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Oct 06, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Oct 06, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I believe @c.pfaffenbichler is trying to point you to right direction how to achieve "flattened" look. He is using curve to reduce contrast and make white things grayish and black to convert to deep gray. Take a look at Curve and try to mimic it with raw file which has too much details.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Oct 06, 2020 1
New Here ,
Oct 06, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

ahhh i see thank you! ill give it a shot

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Oct 06, 2020 0
LEGEND ,
Oct 06, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

On the left of the screenshot is the scan, on the right the »original« with Adjustment Layers etc. 

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Oct 06, 2020 1
Most Valuable Participant ,
Oct 06, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

COMP 1.jpg

From what you have written I assume you have posted a scan of an image shot in RAW and brought into Photoshop with your chosen profile. You would like to change it so that the image on the monitor looks more like your second image. If that is your objective, I suggest you create a Curve and save it so that it can be applied later to other images. Here is how:

 

  1. Create a gray scale similar to the one pictured, perhaps a 10-step version, or even use the one shown above.

 

  1. Choose your current full range image. Add the grayscale as a layer and then flatten the image.

 

  1. Duplicate the file.

 

NOTE: You will use ONLY Curves to arrive at the lower range and contrast you prefer. (In the example below,  perhaps all it required was a reduction in the grayscale d/max from 100 to 77, as shown.)

 

  1. Return to the Full range image and call up Curves.

Note the d/max of the grayscale is 100. Drag down the endpoint and the image range will become flatter. When you are satisfied with that value (in this example:  77) you may find that is all that is needed. In that case, all future images should  use Curves to  produce a d/max of 77.

 

If the mid-tone values require change, add their individual new values to the Curve. Then, in Curves, change the Preset field to Custom, right click on the gear to its right and save the curve shape as a Preset to be loaded whenever needed.   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Oct 06, 2020 2