Highlighted

How to: Animate a hand drawn animal

Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 02, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

A short story:

 

My granddaughter sent me a picture of some colouring in she had done

and was very proud of. I thought it would be fun to animate it and use it to

give her some ongoing encouragement. So my aim was to make producing videos simple.

 

Here's the picture she sent me:

 

Dog original.jpg

 

and here is the end result:

 

 

Process:

Tidy the drawing in photoshop and cut it into layers for the various moving parts:

Muzzle, nose, bone, head, torso, ears, tail.

 

This video show the pieces and the depth ordering:

 

 

So, how to make it easy to turn around videos quickly.

I wanted to be able to provide the voice and do all the animating in one take

without the use of triggers or so.

 

Two things made this possible:

The drawing of the dog had no eyebrows, so I used the eyebrows tag to animate the ears

 

Adobe_Character_Animator_2020.jpg

A dangle behaviour then seals a natural look.

 

Secondly, I added a lower lip in addition to the nose/muzzle layer. See 3D video above.

The muzzle AND the lower lip were set as nutcracker jaws.

Adobe_Character_Animator_2020.jpg

 

Set the movement strength of the two nutcracker jaws such that the muzzle moves

a smaller amount and a higher strength for the lip to give an automated vertical parallax

effect while the puppert is talking.

 

All of this makes it easy to record a take in real time for a quick export.

 

I hope this is of use 🙂

 

 

Best regards, Euan.
Adobe Community Professional
Correct answer by EuanWilliamson | Adobe Community Professional

UPDATE:

David Simons from Adobe has kindly let me know that:

 

David Simons (Adobe) commented  ·   · 

To get negative movement, set Camera Flappiness and/or Audio Flappiness to negative values.

 

This let me move the muzzle vertically UPWARDS based on camera or audio flappiness.

In my case about -30% was perfect.

 

 

TOPICS
How to, Puppet movement, Rigging, Tips and tricks

Views

125

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more

How to: Animate a hand drawn animal

Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 02, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

A short story:

 

My granddaughter sent me a picture of some colouring in she had done

and was very proud of. I thought it would be fun to animate it and use it to

give her some ongoing encouragement. So my aim was to make producing videos simple.

 

Here's the picture she sent me:

 

Dog original.jpg

 

and here is the end result:

 

 

Process:

Tidy the drawing in photoshop and cut it into layers for the various moving parts:

Muzzle, nose, bone, head, torso, ears, tail.

 

This video show the pieces and the depth ordering:

 

 

So, how to make it easy to turn around videos quickly.

I wanted to be able to provide the voice and do all the animating in one take

without the use of triggers or so.

 

Two things made this possible:

The drawing of the dog had no eyebrows, so I used the eyebrows tag to animate the ears

 

Adobe_Character_Animator_2020.jpg

A dangle behaviour then seals a natural look.

 

Secondly, I added a lower lip in addition to the nose/muzzle layer. See 3D video above.

The muzzle AND the lower lip were set as nutcracker jaws.

Adobe_Character_Animator_2020.jpg

 

Set the movement strength of the two nutcracker jaws such that the muzzle moves

a smaller amount and a higher strength for the lip to give an automated vertical parallax

effect while the puppert is talking.

 

All of this makes it easy to record a take in real time for a quick export.

 

I hope this is of use 🙂

 

 

Best regards, Euan.
Adobe Community Professional
Correct answer by EuanWilliamson | Adobe Community Professional

UPDATE:

David Simons from Adobe has kindly let me know that:

 

David Simons (Adobe) commented  ·   · 

To get negative movement, set Camera Flappiness and/or Audio Flappiness to negative values.

 

This let me move the muzzle vertically UPWARDS based on camera or audio flappiness.

In my case about -30% was perfect.

 

 

TOPICS
How to, Puppet movement, Rigging, Tips and tricks

Views

126

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Sep 02, 2020 1
Contributor ,
Sep 02, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Way to go grandpa:)

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Sep 02, 2020 1
Participant ,
Sep 02, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Nicely done Grandpa. I am all for making memories with my grandchildren. I make animated birthday cards for them.

Good move fellow puppeteer. Be well. - Platty

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Sep 02, 2020 1
Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 13, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

UPDATE:

David Simons from Adobe has kindly let me know that:

 

David Simons (Adobe) commented  ·   · 

To get negative movement, set Camera Flappiness and/or Audio Flappiness to negative values.

 

This let me move the muzzle vertically UPWARDS based on camera or audio flappiness.

In my case about -30% was perfect.

 

 

Best regards, Euan.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Sep 13, 2020 0