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Adobe CC background tasks waste significant power

Explorer ,
Oct 30, 2021 Oct 30, 2021

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On my Windows PC (AMD 5900X CPU), I found that with Adobe CC Desktop and the "CEF Helper" apps running in the background, the CPU will "idle" at 17 Watts. This is with no Adobe applications running. If I kill CEF Helper and all the other Adobe CC and updater background apps, my idle power drops down below 3 Watts. (This is CPU power as reported by the Ryzen Master software)


Looking at Task Manager, Adobe CEF Helper is always using at least 1% CPU even when everything is idle. That also means that software like Ryzen Master and Windows Tasks manager, which are monitoring resource usage and updating graphs on screen a couple times a second, are using much much less CPU than the Adobe "background" tasks!


14W may not sound like a lot, but multiply that by a million PCs running this software and what a waste of power! 

TOPICS
Cloud storage web assets, File sync

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New Here ,
Nov 12, 2021 Nov 12, 2021

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I noticed the same thing starting happening a little over a month ago.. After boot, Adobe CEF Helper bounces between 1.5% to 2.6% of CPU usage, even wihen I'm not doing anything with the computer.

 

However, I can stop it if I do this:

  • Click on the Creative Cloud icon in the system tray (it looks like a pair of interlocked rings)--the Creative Cloud Desktop Opens
  • Click the "Files" tab
  • Exit Creative Cloud Desktop

At this point, Adobe CEF Helper normally reverts to using nearly 0% CPU time.

 

@Adobe, what is Creative Cloud doing prior to my clicking the "Files" tab? Can you please stop this? 

 

While it may sound trivial, the 1.5-2.6% can be enough to put total CPU usage over 5%, which is the point where my notebook computer's fan starts running.

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