EPS FILE MAKES LARGE FILE SIZE ON EXPORT

New Here ,
Aug 11, 2022 Aug 11, 2022

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Exporting in either PDF print or PDF interactive, with DPI settings and compression settings done to reduce file size, still can't reduce the file size.

 

And it is because of a linked EPS file that is has transparency. New to ID but in AI atleast you could rasterise.

 

No idea what to do. For some reason my designer was easily able to do this on his MAC via adobe interactive pdf settings. I am on a WINDOWS machine.

 

Attached file removed linked images except the one that was causing the issue.

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Community Expert , Aug 11, 2022 Aug 11, 2022

Hi@sereniteai12061547 ,

the placed EPS contains complex vector graphics: Outlined Text.

If I distill the EPS to PDF the file size comes down from 31 MB to about 4 MB. You cannot reduce this without diminishing quality.

 

I'd suggest the following strategy:

[1] Open the EPS in PhotoShop as 600 ppi Grayscale image.

This would convert the vector graphics to a pixel image.

From my old German InDesign PhotoShop CS6:

OpenEPSinPhotoShop-600ppi-Grayscale.PNG

[2] Change the color of all pixels to Black.

RecolorToBlack-1.PNG

See the Output and Input values of the

...

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Community Expert ,
Aug 11, 2022 Aug 11, 2022

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EPS is an obsolete format.

I suggest you change your fonts to OTFs.

Is your final output for print or digital (or both)?

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Community Expert ,
Aug 11, 2022 Aug 11, 2022

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How big is the PDF? For print a large file isn't necessarily a problem. You aren't clear about the final intent.

Can't do any testing without the links, but here are some thoughts...

First, .eps is an obsolete format, and despite what you say above, it does not support transparency. You should open it in Illustrator and save as either .ai or PDF and place that instead.

Also, cropping the image down to the bleed size and selecting crop image data to the frame during export may help reduce the size of the PDF as well, but since that artwork is vector it shgouldn't be adding a lot of weight anyway, though I see as an .eps it is a bit over 30 mb. You have two .psd that are quite a bit larger, though. Are you down-sampling those on export?

I'm wonmdering, too, why most of the image frames are larger than the images they contain. I don't believe that will cause any export problems, but I would find it difficult to work with the overlaps when editing...

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Community Expert ,
Aug 11, 2022 Aug 11, 2022

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Hi@sereniteai12061547 ,

the placed EPS contains complex vector graphics: Outlined Text.

If I distill the EPS to PDF the file size comes down from 31 MB to about 4 MB. You cannot reduce this without diminishing quality.

 

I'd suggest the following strategy:

[1] Open the EPS in PhotoShop as 600 ppi Grayscale image.

This would convert the vector graphics to a pixel image.

From my old German InDesign PhotoShop CS6:

OpenEPSinPhotoShop-600ppi-Grayscale.PNG

[2] Change the color of all pixels to Black.

RecolorToBlack-1.PNG

See the Output and Input values of the curve. Input: 0, Output: 100.

RecolorToBlack-2.PNG

[3] Convert to Bitmap mode:

ConvertToBitmap-ChangeColorMode.PNG

 

Save as TIFF image. That would bring down the file size to about 2.2 MB.

SaveAsTIFF-Image-Bitmap.PNG

 

Exchange the placed EPS with the TIFF in InDesign and change the color of the placed TIFF to [Paper] in InDesign. To do that select the placed image inside its container frame. From my German InDesign 2022:

PlaceAndRecolorToPaper-InDesign.PNG

 

Now you can downsample the placed and linked graphic when you export to PDF Interactive. If you do this for your cover only by using Maximum JPEG quality with 144 ppi the resulting PDF file size of the cover page will shrink to 74 KB. With 288 ppi you'll get a PDF with file size 118 KB for that cover page.

 

Attached here that interactive PDF with 288 ppi:

SER001 Brochure A5_alt_V3_FA-EDITED-2-Interactive-p1-288ppi.pdf

 

Regards,
Uwe Laubender
( Adobe Community Professional )

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Community Expert ,
Aug 11, 2022 Aug 11, 2022

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For what it's worth, I opened the .eps in Illustrator and saved as both .ai and PDF and the file size shrank to about 14.6 MB while preserving the vectors, which I think would be preferable for print. Also for what it's worth, the PDF version in the link above is only 10.71 MB which is not, in my opinion, overly large for a print file.

I suspect that had the text been left live instead of outlining the file size would be considerably smaller...

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Community Expert ,
Aug 11, 2022 Aug 11, 2022

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It would have, yes.

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Community Expert ,
Aug 11, 2022 Aug 11, 2022

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@Peter Spier said:

"I suspect that had the text been left live instead of outlining the file size would be considerably smaller..."

 

Tremendously smaller, yes!

 

Regards,
Uwe Laubender
( Adobe Community Professional )

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Community Expert ,
Aug 11, 2022 Aug 11, 2022

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I was trying to be subtle about that...

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Community Expert ,
Aug 11, 2022 Aug 11, 2022

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Use ai files. Don't rasterize them. Do not outline text. Save as ai file and place them. Never use EPS in modern times.

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Community Expert ,
Aug 11, 2022 Aug 11, 2022

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I just checked the File Info in the .eps anmd it appears to have been created and saverd from Illustrator in January of this year. That leads me to think the designer may be more used to a Quark workflow. Anyone know if Q strill needs .eps files?

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Community Expert ,
Aug 11, 2022 Aug 11, 2022

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@Peter Spier wrote:

I just checked the File Info in the .eps anmd it appears to have been created and saverd from Illustrator in January of this year. That leads me to think the designer may be more used to a Quark workflow. Anyone know if Q strill needs .eps files?


 

Maybe. But I have found there are still lots of people who think EPS is the proper format for Illustrator files, even Photoshop files with clipping paths. It's like it’s the ’90s. This happens when people work in lousy jobs with high turnover. Nobody bothers to update the standards because nobody is paid enough to care or sticks around long enough that it matters. I’ve been there and there is insurmountable resistance to changing what works, no matter how poorly it works.

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Community Expert ,
Aug 11, 2022 Aug 11, 2022

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Adding to other replies to avoid EPS. It doesn't sound like it's really necessary for your workflow.

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Community Expert ,
Aug 11, 2022 Aug 11, 2022

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The format is not the issue.

The issue (and Uwe has alreadt touched on this): Because the text has been outlined, there are literally THOUSANDS of vector objects in this file, most of which are outside the area you have cropped it to on each page it's used, but are objects exported no matter how you crop it. Even is you save this Illustrator file as an .AI file, it's still a large file as that is literally the smallest even PDF code will make this file. You cannot define these objects with less code than this.

So, what to do. As Uwe suggested, export the file as a rastered object.

Based on the Illustrator file (which, despite what you say does not have transparency in it: the objects are simply filled with white), I suggest even a simpler way: Export the Illustrator file as-is As a PNG file at 600 dpi, antialiasing:None, transaparent background. The PNG file will be very compressed because it's just one colour, and then you can save PDF at whatever settings you want.

(and for those you want to poopoo PNG in general, this is actiually a perfect time to use it)

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Community Expert ,
Aug 12, 2022 Aug 12, 2022

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Hi Brad,

in this special case I still think the best strategy is to convert to a 1-Bit bitmap TIFF file as I showed this.

Even if you render it to 1200 ppi you gain a lot flexibility and the most compression if the placed TIFF is simply colored with [Paper].

 

It's not clear for me why the exported PDF from the document should be in a small file size.

If you want to print it, digitally or offset, a PDF of around 20 MB (my estimate) for all pages and this complexity is no issue at all.

If you want to show it on a website and you need a downloadable and digestible PDF document for "home use", the THOUSANDS of vector objects are a show-stopper. Rendering time in any PDF viewer, rendereing time for a printer in the office or at home. Even if the text would not be outlined, the rendering time could be huge.

 

Regards,
Uwe Laubender
( Adobe Community Professional )

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