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Facing issues with image placement and quality in InDesign

Explorer ,
Apr 07, 2024 Apr 07, 2024

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I'm having unexpected resizing of JPEG images and pixelation of PNG images when placing them into my InDesign document. Despite setting the document dimensions to 1009 px X 662 px, when I import a JPEG image with dimensions of 400 px X 300 px, it gets resized to 96 px X 72 px. Additionally, while the PNG images are retaining their correct size, they appear pixelated, as if the Display Performance is not set to high quality, even though it is. How can I resolve these issues to maintain the original dimensions and quality of my images within InDesign and when I want to compress then I can with any application like https://jpegcompressor.com

It could really admirable for your greatfull information.

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correct answers 2 Correct answers

Community Expert , Apr 07, 2024 Apr 07, 2024

I wrote an article here to  help work you through it
https://creativepro.com/high-res-image-look-low-res/

 

 

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Community Expert , Apr 09, 2024 Apr 09, 2024

IMO JPGs (that haven't been over compressed) are fine for print and better that TIFFs because they are much smaller in size than TIFFs, – the "better quality" of TIFFs is inperceptable for most commercial uses. PSD are also fine as you can "round trip" between InDesign and Photoshop to fine-tune them.

Your orginal image that's 400 x 300px would print at around 1.5" x 1" – if you want to print it to a larger size and if you can't get the orginal image, try and enlarge it in Photoshop using: Image

...

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Community Expert ,
Apr 07, 2024 Apr 07, 2024

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I wrote an article here to  help work you through it
https://creativepro.com/high-res-image-look-low-res/

 

 

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Explorer ,
Apr 08, 2024 Apr 08, 2024

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Hey hi, Thanks for you reply but How can I check the effective resolution of images in Adobe InDesign to ensure they are high resolution before printing? Additionally, how do I manage individual graphics display performance separately within the document?

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Community Expert ,
Apr 08, 2024 Apr 08, 2024

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You can check the Effective PPI of each image in the Links panel. Aim for around 300PPI for print documents, though you can probably get away with 200PPI. 

The Display Performance setting is applied to the whole InDesign document, not to particular images within it.

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Explorer ,
Apr 08, 2024 Apr 08, 2024

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Ok thank you for the greate information.

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Community Expert ,
Apr 08, 2024 Apr 08, 2024

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It's in the article - exactly the information you asked about.

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Community Expert ,
Apr 08, 2024 Apr 08, 2024

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This article is a great article & summary, Eugene. I'm going to share it with my students.

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Community Expert ,
Apr 08, 2024 Apr 08, 2024

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Great! Thanks. 

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Community Expert ,
Apr 08, 2024 Apr 08, 2024

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In addition to other suggestions, you may also want to read this recent discussion:

https://community.adobe.com/t5/indesign-discussions/why-does-a-1024x1024-pixel-image-when-placed-in-...

 

It covers the exact issue with JPEG resizing you experience and more.

 

 

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Community Expert ,
Apr 08, 2024 Apr 08, 2024

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quote

I'm having unexpected resizing of JPEG images and pixelation of PNG images when placing them into my InDesign document. Despite setting the document dimensions to 1009 px X 662 px, when I import a JPEG image with dimensions of 400 px X 300 px, it gets resized to 96 px X 72 px...


By @sneha30692552dvkj

 

P.S. As far as I understand from your other replies, your document is intended for print. Pixels for document size don't have any meaning in the context of print so you may want to change the units to what's appropriate for print (inch, cm etc.) Also, in general avoid using JPEG and PNG for print jobs, use PSD or TIFF instead (if compression to save space is important, then use TIFF with LZW compression). 

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Explorer ,
Apr 08, 2024 Apr 08, 2024

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Okay thank for suggesting me this type of resource and information.

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Community Expert ,
Apr 09, 2024 Apr 09, 2024

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IMO JPGs (that haven't been over compressed) are fine for print and better that TIFFs because they are much smaller in size than TIFFs, – the "better quality" of TIFFs is inperceptable for most commercial uses. PSD are also fine as you can "round trip" between InDesign and Photoshop to fine-tune them.

Your orginal image that's 400 x 300px would print at around 1.5" x 1" – if you want to print it to a larger size and if you can't get the orginal image, try and enlarge it in Photoshop using: Image > Image Size (ticking Resample), then using a little Unsharp Mask.
How successful this will be will depend on the quality of the original and what you are prerpared to put up with!

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