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font license warning when exporting to pdf from indesign

Contributor ,
Mar 08, 2018 Mar 08, 2018

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Hi everyone,

I downloaded the fonts at the following url:

Christian Crosses Font | dafont.com

After using one of them in my Indesign file, I tried to export to pdf however it said that there was a problem with the licensing of the font. The above url said that the fonts were free which is why I was using them but I'm happy to pay for them if I can find out where they came from.

I wondered if anyone could either help me with the pdf export issue or let me know where I can purchase the font from.

Would really appreciate any help.

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correct answers 1 Correct answer

Mar 08, 2018 Mar 08, 2018
The fonts in question were created no later than in 1997 with the font embedding privileges set to not allow any embedding of said fonts whatsoever! This is a legal issue. Adobe software respects the intent of the fonts' creators and will not embed any fonts into PDF files where the embedding privileges restrict against such embedding.Based on the contents of the text files within the ZIP file that you downloaded from dafont.com, I suspect that the supposed creator of the font, Ben McGehee, may ...

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 08, 2018 Mar 08, 2018

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What is the EXACT message?

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Contributor ,
Mar 08, 2018 Mar 08, 2018

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Thanks for the reply,

It says:

"Export:  Wedding Booklet.pdf"

Christian Crosses III: This font could not be embedded due to licensing restrictions in the font. A substitute font will be used if it supports the glyphs used in the "

That's all it said - nothing after the word "the"

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 08, 2018 Mar 08, 2018

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It means exactly what it says.

There is no way to embed that font in a PDF. Find another font.

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Contributor ,
Mar 08, 2018 Mar 08, 2018

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Ok but how do I find the font on the url that I mentioned before? I just want to use one of those crosses.

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Guru ,
Mar 08, 2018 Mar 08, 2018

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outline the text than make the .pdf. don't save the indesign file so it does not saves it with the outlined text.  This way you keep the editable text in your art file always.

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Mar 08, 2018 Mar 08, 2018

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The process of “outlining text” is most often not a legal means of bypassing font embedding restrictions. Besides degrading rendering quality, in the general case, you are violating the End User License Agreement accompanying fonts.

          - Dov

- Dov Isaacs, former Adobe Principal Scientist (April 30, 1990 - May 30, 2021)

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Mentor ,
Mar 08, 2018 Mar 08, 2018

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Just tested.

Yup, indeed, embedding is restricted... PDF export fails.

cross1.PNG

cross2.PNG

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Mar 08, 2018 Mar 08, 2018

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The fonts in question were created no later than in 1997 with the font embedding privileges set to not allow any embedding of said fonts whatsoever! This is a legal issue. Adobe software respects the intent of the fonts' creators and will not embed any fonts into PDF files where the embedding privileges restrict against such embedding.

Based on the contents of the text files within the ZIP file that you downloaded from dafont.com, I suspect that the supposed creator of the font, Ben McGehee, may not have known anything about how to properly set the embedding privileges within the font since the text files claim that the fonts are “freeware.”

Short of successfully contacting Ben McGehee (he isn't at the website and e-mail mentioned in those text files) and having him create a version of those fonts without the embedding restriction, you are restricted from embedding them in PDF files. Unfortunately, InDesign's PDF export (or any other PDF creation tool) cannot be clairvoyant in terms of knowing what the font creator intended to do. Sorry!

          - Dov

- Dov Isaacs, former Adobe Principal Scientist (April 30, 1990 - May 30, 2021)

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