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Source profiles that don’t match Warning (even after deleting ALL the images!!!)

Explorer ,
Sep 14, 2021 Sep 14, 2021

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Hi, I'm ready to upload an InDesign project with Blurb plugin. So, I try to export a test-PDF in Blurb preset, but InDesign reports a warning: «The preset specifies source profiles that don’t match the current color settings file. Profiles specified by the current color setting will be used».

I can say that ALL the images have been previously converted into Blurb CMYK profile (in Photoshop). The strange thing is that even deleting ALL the images (keeping only text), InDesign still reports the same warning!!!

Is it a Poltergeist phenomenon?

Thanks in advance.

(P.S. As always Blurb's support can't say...)

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Bug, Import and export, Publish online

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correct answers 2 Correct answers

Adobe Community Professional , Sep 14, 2021 Sep 14, 2021
NO. It says YOUR settings, not the ones in the preset, will be used, which is exactly what you want, if you are using the correct profiles. Remember, these are SOURCE profiles, not destination, so all it means is you've used different profiles than the preset expected, but they will be respected and used. I see this warning every time I export a PDF for print.

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Adobe Community Professional , Sep 17, 2021 Sep 17, 2021
Color Settings are your color preferences for new documents, they wouldn't normally color manage an existing document. For existing documents check Edit>Assign Profiles..., which will show the RGB and CMYK profiles assigned to the document. PDFs can have any number of objects with different color spaces and embedded profiles. PDF/X exports include an Output Intent CMYK profile, and all CMYK objects with matching profiles export as DeviceCMYK (no embedded profile).

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Explorer ,
Sep 14, 2021 Sep 14, 2021

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Crazy update: I tried to export a new file with a single EMPTY page (Color settings on Blurb)... same warning appears!!!

It should be the well known Blurb's Poltergeist phenomenon...

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 14, 2021 Sep 14, 2021

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Your color settings may be part of your document, but they're independent of your document.

 

Color settings are metadata — kind of a structural definition behind your InDesign document — that explains how to adapt color values and apply color management standards and rules for your document output. They are applied whenever you open any document, independent of the graphic elements you place into it.

 

You can learn more about color management here. If you're inclined, follow some of the links on this help page to learn a lot about InDesign color management, and why it's done. And also, how to tailor it for specific purposes like creating digital documents.

 

Hope this helps,

 

Randy

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Explorer ,
Sep 14, 2021 Sep 14, 2021

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Randy thanks for your reply and for the link.

Perhaps it's me, but this doesn't give an answer to my problem. Or at least not an operative answer.

In few words: what should I do?

Thanks

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 14, 2021 Sep 14, 2021

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Depending on the version(s) of InDesign and Photoshop you're using, if you have the color settings for all your images in Photoshop you should be able to switch to the same color settings in your InDesign application too. Just go to the Edit>Color Settings... menu command and match what you see in the Color Settings dialog box to match what you see in Photoshop.

 

Get it right, click the OK button and it should be the end of your current problems. You can see how to do that through the link I gave you. It'll be good for you to read that too, so you have some idea of what you're doing poking around these settings.

 

Good luck,

 

Randy

 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 14, 2021 Sep 14, 2021

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In general that warning can be ignored. It generally happens becasue the preset is based on something generic and customized. The settings may specify color settings that differ from the profile that Blurb wants you to use.

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Explorer ,
Sep 14, 2021 Sep 14, 2021

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quote

In general that warning can be ignored...

By @Peter Spier

 

Thanks Peter for your reply.

My doubt is: you say I can ignore it, but that warning should say that my images will be re-converted to match the Blurb's profile (that ironically they have yet!) And I really don't want my images will be reconverted!
This problem is not directly my problem, since I upload the project with Blurb's plugin directly to Blurb's cloud. But the problem could be later: once Blurb will receive the file, that warning could imply an antomatic (and unnecessary) re-conversion. Is that right?

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 14, 2021 Sep 14, 2021

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NO. It says YOUR settings, not the ones in the preset, will be used, which is exactly what you want, if you are using the correct profiles. Remember, these are SOURCE profiles, not destination, so all it means is you've used different profiles than the preset expected, but they will be respected and used.

 

I see this warning every time I export a PDF for print.

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Explorer ,
Sep 14, 2021 Sep 14, 2021

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Many thanks Peter!

Just curious, how to see in ID the profile embedded in the images? I mean, if I see my images in Adobe Bridge there is written Blurb_ICC_Profile.icc. Instead, in ID's Links panel I find a generic “Document CMYK”... Where is the spec that reports the profile?

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 15, 2021 Sep 15, 2021

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I'm afraid I can't really answer that. I looked at the link info in an old file and thought perhaps ID was saying if the embedded profile matched the working space it reported it as Document CMYK, but I changed the assigned profile for the document and the link info did not change, so I really don't know. Perhaps if Rob Day (who is way better versed in the intracies of profiles than I am) sees this he'll weigh in.

I can tell you that for years (I switched from Quark to ID for most work at version 2) I did all my work converting to CMYK to match the press profile (being a control freak and not trusting the conversion on export to necessarily make the shadow adjustments I needed), used that profile as the working space for the document, ignored the profile warning on export, and got as near a match on press to what I saw on my calibrated and profiled monitor as technology would allow. This was for a range of work from relatively non-critical promotional brochures, to more color critical assets for a gem dealer client, to very critical art museum exhibition catalogs.

I tend to leave images in RGB now, however, and do the conversions on export like everyone else. If shadow adjustments are required I do them in RGB and save a new copy. This is a lot more versatile for matching a range of output devices.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 15, 2021 Sep 15, 2021

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This has come up a number of times and Peter is right, you can ignore the warning. I'm traveling so I can't post captures, but if it's the warning that shows in the Export setup dialog, it happens when the InDesign document's assigned RGB and CMYK profiles are not the default sRGB and US Web Coated SWOP--you could get the warning in a document with no placed images.

Obviously there are many cases where the default profiles should not be used--I would never use sRGB for a print project--so if it is the same warning, it can be ignored.

 

You might want to post a capture so we can confirm.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 15, 2021 Sep 15, 2021

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Also, if you are exporting to PDF/X-3, with No Color Coversion, which I think is Blurb's recommendation, you can check the exported CMYK Separation values in AcrobatPro's Output Preview.

 

if I see my images in Adobe Bridge there is written Blurb_ICC_Profile.icc. Instead, in ID's Links panel I find a generic “Document CMYK”... Where is the spec that reports the profile?

 

When you create a document with the Color Settings CMYK CM Policy set to Preserve Numbers (Ignore Linked Profiles) the profile listed in Links will be Document CMYK--the document's assigned profile is being used to colormanage the link.

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Explorer ,
Sep 15, 2021 Sep 15, 2021

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Dear Rob, thanks for your reply.

The point is that I don't export any PDF file. Since I use Blurb's plugin in ID, I simply upload the ID project itself. (So - you could tell - you can easily ignore the warning.) The problem is that when I try to upload the ID project via Blurb's plugin, also the plugin itself reports the same warning! Also, the strange thing is that even when ID doesn't report any warning, Blurb's plugin surely does!

My point is simply avoiding a new re-conversion made by Blurb...
(You'll say «ask to Blurb»... Yeah... Blurb is a modern oracle...)

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 15, 2021 Sep 15, 2021

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Can you post a capture of Blurb's warning?

 

Also, what are the document's assigned profiles (Edit>Assign Profiles..., not Color Settings' Working spaces)?

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Explorer ,
Sep 16, 2021 Sep 16, 2021

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Sorry for my delay, Rob. I tried all my best to solve all my problems. It seems that now no more warning is annoying me anymore (fingers crossed).
Anyway, after preflight test I noticed that colors in the test-PDF are darker. Just a bit.
My Color Settings are on Blurb preset and Assign Profiles are on Working Space, BUT... every time after the preflight test (after the test-PDF is produced) I see that Color Settings is changed automatically into SWOP!!!

Is it the reason of the darker images?

(Thanks in advance.) 

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Explorer ,
Sep 16, 2021 Sep 16, 2021

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...Also, in Adobe Bridge, the preflight-PDF is reported as Color Profile UNTAGGED! How is it possible?

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 17, 2021 Sep 17, 2021

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Color Settings are your color preferences for new documents, they wouldn't normally color manage an existing document. For existing documents check Edit>Assign Profiles..., which will show the RGB and CMYK profiles assigned to the document.

 

PDFs can have any number of objects with different color spaces and embedded profiles. PDF/X exports include an Output Intent CMYK profile, and all CMYK objects with matching profiles export as DeviceCMYK (no embedded profile).

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Explorer ,
Sep 17, 2021 Sep 17, 2021

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Many thanks Rob. All you wrote answers almost all my doubts, but one: so why my PDF is darker than the ID project? Is it normal?

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 17, 2021 Sep 17, 2021

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Are you viewing the InDesign file with Overprint Preview on, and are you viewing the exported PDF in AcrobatPro with its Output Preview open and the Blurb profile set as the Simulation profile?

 

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Explorer ,
Sep 17, 2021 Sep 17, 2021

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Here attached the comparison: ID Overprint preview VS Acrobat Pro Overprint preview.

Color are different, right?

Screenshot 2021-09-17 at 23.27.29.jpg

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 17, 2021 Sep 17, 2021

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I have to say that on my monitor they look identical. Check the numbers in separations preview in ID and output preview in Acrobat.

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Explorer ,
Sep 17, 2021 Sep 17, 2021

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Hi, Peter. Here the screenshot of cyan:

Screenshot 2021-09-18 at 03.40.44.jpg

That's a competely different cyan, right?

Here is a video a the preflight in InDesign with Blurb plugin.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 17, 2021 Sep 17, 2021

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After running the Blurb plug-in you are showing the Color Settings change, but do the document profile assignments also change when you check Edit>Assign Profiles..., the document assignments control the preview.


Also, is the Blurb plugin generating the PDF or are you exporting. Doesn't look like it's a PDF/X, which would default to the Output Intent profile as the Simulation profile.

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Explorer ,
Sep 17, 2021 Sep 17, 2021

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Here the Assign Profiles after the preflight conversion:

Screenshot 2021-09-18 at 05.30.35.jpg

The generated PDF is automatically generated by Blurb Plugin. And here probably is the mistery solution:

In Adobe PDF Preset, Blurb_PDF_Export sets Output intent as SWOP!

Screenshot 2021-09-18 at 05.38.02.jpg

That is Blurb's own preset... I really can't understand: why do they output a SWOP profiled PDF? Why not their own profile??? What is the meaning of recommending their ICC profile, if at the end they make you output a SWOP PDF?

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Explorer ,
Sep 17, 2021 Sep 17, 2021

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I can also confirm that Acrobat Pro sees all the preflight-PDF images as DeviceCMYK, that in conjuction with the automatic Output intent as SWOP, should mean that all the PDF's images are SWOP-assigned. If it's so, I really can't understand Blurb's policy about their own ICC profile...

At this point, I also can't understand why they recommend to convert all the images in Blurb ICC CMYK (in Photoshop) before importing in a Blurb-generated InDesign project!

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