Source profiles that don’t match Warning (even after deleting ALL the images!!!)

Explorer ,
Sep 14, 2021 Sep 14, 2021

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Hi, I'm ready to upload an InDesign project with Blurb plugin. So, I try to export a test-PDF in Blurb preset, but InDesign reports a warning: «The preset specifies source profiles that don’t match the current color settings file. Profiles specified by the current color setting will be used».

I can say that ALL the images have been previously converted into Blurb CMYK profile (in Photoshop). The strange thing is that even deleting ALL the images (keeping only text), InDesign still reports the same warning!!!

Is it a Poltergeist phenomenon?

Thanks in advance.

(P.S. As always Blurb's support can't say...)

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Bug , Import and export , Publish online

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correct answers 2 Correct answers

Adobe Community Professional , Sep 14, 2021 Sep 14, 2021
NO. It says YOUR settings, not the ones in the preset, will be used, which is exactly what you want, if you are using the correct profiles. Remember, these are SOURCE profiles, not destination, so all it means is you've used different profiles than the preset expected, but they will be respected and used. I see this warning every time I export a PDF for print.

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Adobe Community Professional , Sep 17, 2021 Sep 17, 2021
Color Settings are your color preferences for new documents, they wouldn't normally color manage an existing document. For existing documents check Edit>Assign Profiles..., which will show the RGB and CMYK profiles assigned to the document. PDFs can have any number of objects with different color spaces and embedded profiles. PDF/X exports include an Output Intent CMYK profile, and all CMYK objects with matching profiles export as DeviceCMYK (no embedded profile).

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 18, 2021 Sep 18, 2021

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With online automated printing you can't really control the CMYK output numbers--it's likely that Blurb will make an additional conversion at output. Online printers usually request CMYK so the client is forced to view color in the CMYK gamut, and then use device link profiles to get the color into the final output space. 

Here is a similar thread in the Photoshop forum:

https://community.adobe.com/t5/photoshop-ecosystem-discussions/is-it-possible-to-change-gcr-ucr-in-a...

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Explorer ,
Sep 18, 2021 Sep 18, 2021

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OK, but why do they recommend to do the conversion in CMYK before importing images in InDesign?

From Lightroom they say «sRGB» (obviously, since LR has only RGB);

From their own app (Bookwright) they say «sRGB».

Instead, from InDesign they want CMYK: they want their profile in PS, then their preset in ID, and finally they happily mess up everything!

So, what is the point of making an InDesign plugin if the result is largely worst than with their free app?

Funny thing is that they say «Use InDesign plugin if you want to have the full control». Yeah...

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 18, 2021 Sep 18, 2021

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It's stuff like this that keeps me with my local printer who I know, trust, and can talk to.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 18, 2021 Sep 18, 2021

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There is also the option to place tagged RGB images and let the conversion to CMYK happen at output--the PDF/X-3 preset accomodates tagged RGB.

 

Otherwise if you want to make your own CMYK conversion run a proof book ($20) with CMYK targets. If you know what to look for a target will tell you whether the PDFs CMYK values are being output unchanged.

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Explorer ,
Sep 18, 2021 Sep 18, 2021

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Yes, the conversion directly in InDesign is an option, but Blurb recommend very clearly to import only CMYK images in ID. Sincerely I don't know why. But knowing a bit the policy of Blurb, I'm sure if the ID workflow could be easier (for example, «import sRGB and let ID do the job») they surely would have recommend that!

For ALL their stuff, their slogan is «take it easy, you have to do almost nothing!» Instead for InDesign Plugin they wrote an article dedicated to CMYK conversion in PS before importing in ID, so...

I ordered a test, but I have “bad vibrations” (since the preflight), so I'm working right now on a new test...

 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 18, 2021 Sep 18, 2021

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Again the reason online printers recommend CMYK is it forces a CMYK preview--an inexperienced user might think RGB 0|0|255 is a printable color. 

They are likely making a Device Link conversion to the final print space when you provide CMYK output. Their single CMYK output profile would not be accurate for both coated and uncoated sheets.

 

A direct conversion from profiled RGB where you are viewing the RGB in a CMYK proofing space to see the gamut would be better color management, but you can't expect all users to get that concept.


They recommend sRGB but any profiled RGB space should work in a modern color managed print flow.

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