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sum of ink exceeding maximum value of standard ISO 320%

Explorer ,
Dec 11, 2023 Dec 11, 2023

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Hi,

 

I'm getting this query from the printer: 

"sum of ink exceeding maximum value of standard ISO 320% (350% in special conditions). Printing with supplied artwork may cause an problem with stability of colours on the printout or/and can cause sheets to stick together in stock. In current case sum of ink equals 355 %."

 

unnamed-1.png

 

Does anyone know how export the image from photoshop, or what settings of InDesign I can change to avoid this? 

 

Thanks!

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Community Expert ,
Dec 11, 2023 Dec 11, 2023

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Did you place a CMYK image into InDesign. If a CMYK image is edited after conversion to CMYK it can happen that the maximum value is exceeded.

In InDesign are normally RGB images imported and converted to CMYK with the final PDF export or later with the APPE (Adobe PDF Print Engine). In Photoshop you need to turn on the CMYK Print Preview when you work with RGB images for print.

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Explorer ,
Dec 11, 2023 Dec 11, 2023

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The image was originally palced as RGB, and file exported as PDF/X-4:2010  standard, with colour conversion to CMYK Convert to destination (Preserve Numbers). 

 

Not sure how the ink coverage came out 355%. I am asking myself, is there anything one could do directly on the image in Photoshop to avoid this, or is there a way to tell InDesign to limit the ink coverage of specific assets? 

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Community Beginner ,
Dec 11, 2023 Dec 11, 2023

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The printer is stating that the sum of the C, M, Y, and K, percentages is 355%. That's the area highlighted in bright green on your screenshot - this area of your image must be very dark.

This high ink coverage can be problematic in lithographic printing. When printing on a litho press, if there's too much ink on a large area of the paper, it can lead to "set off." Set off is when ink from one sheet rubs off onto the back of the next sheet, causing smudging.

To fix this issue with the image, you can open it in Photoshop, convert it to CMYK mode if it isn't already, then see the CMYK percentages in the info panel. Then use the Levels or Selective Color tools to reduce the about of CMY (you might need to up the K slightly to compensate) to get the total sum of the CMYK values under 320%.

Other useful help about this issue is courtesy of David Blatner at https://creativepro.com/force-color-images-cmyk-240-ink-limit/

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Community Expert ,
Dec 13, 2023 Dec 13, 2023

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Hi @Good Venture ,

also check if an effect is applied to the image or its container frame that adds extra color to the image's pixels.

Remove the effect then…

 

FWIW:

Usually a printing company's prepress department could tackle the issue by converting your PDF with a special color server using Device Link technology so that the TAC does not exceed a certain amount of color without changing the appearance of the image in an unacceptable way…

 

Regards,
Uwe Laubender
( Adobe Community Expert )

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