Images acquire red tint when exported.

Community Beginner ,
Feb 14, 2020 Feb 14, 2020

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Screenshot (1287).pngI've seen this posted in plenty of forums already, but the solution to all of them was not my solution.  The amount of color burning changes depending on who knows what.  The image shown is an extreme case, given that it is not very warm to begin with.  The screenshotted display was not opened in chrome, but I have tried that, and it doesn't change anything.  I've sent the images to other devices and it's looked exactly the same as it does here, different than in lightroom, oversaturated with a red tint.  I have no export presets enabled.  I edit the DNG in AdobeRGB and export as sRGB.  I've calibrated my display.  I've disabled flux.  I don't know what to do.

 

UPDATE: I exported as DNG and opened in camera raw.  The colors did not change.  I exported as PNG and opened in chrome; the red tint was there as with the JPG.

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correct answers 1 Correct answer

Adobe Community Professional , Feb 14, 2020 Feb 14, 2020
The difference between these two is almost identical to the difference between sRGB and Adobe RGB - or between a standard gamut and a wide gamut display. So that in itself would explain it - if that laptop has a wide gamut display. Unfortunately you can never tell with laptops, they change specifications constantly. It's a moving target. I was hoping for a desktop monitor, then you could be sure. If it is wide gamut, two things: One, you cannot use software that isn't color managed. It will ...

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Feb 14, 2020 Feb 14, 2020

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The very first thing you need to know is that Windows "Photos" is not color managed. It can not be trusted or used as a reference for anything, least of all correct colors. It ignores the document profile, and it ignores your monitor profile.

 

What display are you viewing this on? Make and model?

 

You say you calibrated your display - how? what calibrator did you use?

 

It could be that you have a defective monitor profile, but it's impossible to say without the answer to the two questions above.

 

 

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Community Beginner ,
Feb 14, 2020 Feb 14, 2020

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For sure. 

 

Dell XPS 13 from 2016. 

 

Nothing fancy - I literally just used a reference image and the calibration accessible through windows' settings. 

 

I just figured it couldn't be my display if it looks the same on every monitor I've viewed it on; I've been told chrome is color managed, and it still looks red in chrome.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Feb 14, 2020 Feb 14, 2020

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The difference between these two is almost identical to the difference between sRGB and Adobe RGB - or between a standard gamut and a wide gamut display.

 

So that in itself would explain it - if that laptop has a wide gamut display. Unfortunately you can never tell with laptops, they change specifications constantly. It's a moving target. I was hoping for a desktop monitor, then you could be sure.

 

If it is wide gamut, two things: One, you cannot use software that isn't color managed. It will display oversaturated. Two, you need to get a proper calibrator.

 

Does Lightroom display identically in Library and Develop? Do you have Photoshop to test too?

 

I've heard of cases where Chrome's color management isn't working correctly. I don't use it myself so I don't have any experience with it.

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Community Beginner ,
Feb 14, 2020 Feb 14, 2020

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Color me foolish.  It was indeed Chrome's (and any other application I'd been viewing in on other devices') fault.  I opened the JPG in Photoshop and it looked fine.  I definitely should have seen red flags when it looked similar in Chrome to Windows' photo viewer, but people have said that the most recent version of that is now color managed, too; I guess not, or I don't have it.  

 

I also had no idea the difference could be so drastic..

 

Thank you for your time, and I'm sorry I couldn't present a unique and more interesting problem.  

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Feb 15, 2020 Feb 15, 2020

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"I also had no idea the difference could be so drastic"

 

At any time, it is equal to the difference between the document color space, and the display's native color space. That's the difference you see. Those two are never identical, just more or less close.

 

Most displays are natively pretty close to sRGB. That's why you can display sRGB content without color management, and it will appear roughly right. Not entirely right, but ballpark.

 

The more the display differs from sRGB, the wronger it gets. So you need color management to remap one into the other. That's what color managed applications do, using your monitor profile to do it.

 

A generic manufacturer monitor profile is better than nothing, but the profile really needs to be an accurate description of your specific display. It needs to be a description of actual and current response, such as it is. Only a calibrator can give you that, and then the file file be correctly represented on screen.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Feb 14, 2020 Feb 14, 2020

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LR is color managed. Whenever anything you export doesn’t match, it is due to that other product NOT being color managed. Otherwise the two would match. 


Author “Color Management for Photographers" & "Photoshop CC Color Management/pluralsight"

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New Here ,
Feb 03, 2022 Feb 03, 2022

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If the goal is to have the same colors, be it raw in LR or a jpg in chrome or any other viewer (eg what your client uses to watch his photos), I do not understand how to export this so your client will get the color space as you intended. 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Feb 03, 2022 Feb 03, 2022

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An export of ANY color space will have an embedded profile defining that color space and all color managed apps will behave “correctly” like LR/ACR etc.

If the app isn't color managed, this is all a mystery.

You cannot control how others view your images. 


Author “Color Management for Photographers" & "Photoshop CC Color Management/pluralsight"

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