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Laptop monitor native colors are too saturated.

Explorer ,
Oct 22, 2023 Oct 22, 2023

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hi,

Laptop monitor native colors are too saturated. could somebody give me an advice how to fix it. this is my current setting (see below). thanks for help:-)

Screenshot 2023-10-22 173539.png

Screenshot 2023-10-22 173539.png

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LEGEND ,
Oct 22, 2023 Oct 22, 2023

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What does this have to do with LightRoom?

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Explorer ,
Oct 22, 2023 Oct 22, 2023

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hi, just wan't to ask if somebody has the same issue. and may be an advise? would be of great help.

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Community Expert ,
Oct 22, 2023 Oct 22, 2023

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The profile is set to “Premier Color Rec.601 10000”. A web search says that is the name of a profile provided by Dell for their PremierColor line of displays. Are you using a Dell laptop with a PremierColor display?

 

Another web search says that Rec.601 is a color standard for digital video editing (like Rec.709 and Rec.2020), and that 10000 is one of the white points supported by the PremierColor display. Are you editing video that requires Rec.601 at a color temperature of 10000K? If not, and if you are editing photos, try choosing a display profile that is more commonly used for photo editing, such as Adobe RGB or sRGB. Another web search says the Dell PremierColor line includes displays that are capable of reproducing Adobe RGB, so if that is true for the display in your laptop, try setting the profile to Adobe RGB. If it still looks wrong, try sRGB.

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Explorer ,
Oct 22, 2023 Oct 22, 2023

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thanks a lot for your great help. by instance, which are you using Adobe RGB or sRGB. i am just editing photos. and would like to have as real colors as possible. thanks a lot. kr

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Community Expert ,
Oct 23, 2023 Oct 23, 2023

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If you want accurate colors, use a hardware calibrator to calibrate the monitor.

This will also create and install a custom monitor profile that accurately describes the monitor. This profile will be more accurate than using sRGB or Adobe RGB.

 

The second best solution is to use sRGB or Adobe RGB, but the accuracy will depend on how close your monitor's gamut is to these color spaces. If the gamut is 100% sRGB or 100% Adobe RGB, these profiles will be reasonably accurate.

What is the make and model of your laptop?

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Explorer ,
Oct 23, 2023 Oct 23, 2023

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hi, thanks a lot. My laptop is DELL XPS 15 9530. so what you mean ...i tried both sRGB an Adobe RGB. but it seems not perfect?
my second solution will be buy a calibrator for the monitor.

thanks a lot for an answer.

kr

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Community Expert ,
Oct 23, 2023 Oct 23, 2023

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As Per says. The short answer is that this is why people buy and use calibrators.

 

I've been trying to figure out what kind of display this laptop has, and apparently it's neither standard gamut or "traditional" wide gamut, but the P3 wide gamut variety. Dell's marketing fluff just talks about the fantastic color, which isn't much help... 😉

 

For the calibrator this doesn't matter, it just profiles the display as-is. But if you need a temporary stock profile that will be workable in the meantime, you need to use the one called "Image P3".

 

It should also be said that Dell's monitor profiles are notoriously bad. So I'm not surprised your getting into problems.

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Explorer ,
Oct 23, 2023 Oct 23, 2023

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...thanks for the sincere words regarding dell :-)! the monitor is fabulous but to saturated :-(.

yes we are speaking of the monitor on sistem level not lightroom.

could this calibrator work: https://www.photospecialist.it/datacolor-spyderx-pro?hic_camp=google_ads%3A17534358922%3A%3A&gclid=C...

 

thanks for help.

kr alexander

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Community Expert ,
Oct 23, 2023 Oct 23, 2023

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According to Dell, the cheaper 1920 x 1080 screen is 100% sRGB, so if you have that, use sRGB.

The 3456 x 2160 OLED screen is 100% DCI-P3. This is a profile designed for projection, and apparently has a greenish white, so you should use Image P3 instead.

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Community Expert ,
Oct 23, 2023 Oct 23, 2023

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When changing the monitor profile, either do it with LrC (and other color managed applications) closed, or restart LrC after changing the profile. Applications read the monitor profile on launch.

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Explorer ,
Oct 23, 2023 Oct 23, 2023

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...sure i restart LrC

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Explorer ,
Oct 23, 2023 Oct 23, 2023

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hi, this is my monitor  OLED touchscreen
3456 x 2160 (3.5K)

so not the cheap version:-).

so i try with

alexander_P_999_0-1698070018045.png

 

thanks a lot. will let you know 🙂

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Community Expert ,
Oct 23, 2023 Oct 23, 2023

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Per Bentsen answered before me, and correctly, because his answer is also my answer: I use a custom display profile that was specifically generated by a calibration device, which is always the best profile to use if possible.

 

If you don’t own a calibration device, choose a profile supplied by the display manufacturer, that matches the native color behavior of the display. I don’t know what the right answer is for your display, but if the user manual says what the native color space of the display is (such as Adobe RGB or P3), that would be the one to try first. I am guessing the Premier Color display supports wide gamut color, otherwise it would not offer Adobe RGB as an option. With today’s displays, especially the advanced ones, selecting the manufacturer’s profile should be close enough for many purposes, even if it isn’t perfect. In other words, if the colors look very wrong with manufacturer’s profile, the problem may be somewhere else.

 

For example, take into account which application is being displayed, because some use color profiles and others don’t. Lightroom Classic is one of the easier ones, because it automatically recognizes the embedded profile in an image (if present) and sends color-managed information to the OS to show using the display profile. Photoshop may require a few more manual steps. And some basic picture viewers don’t use color management at all, so if the photo is viewed in one of those, that might be a reason colors would look wrong on a wide gamut display even with the correct display profile selected.

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Community Expert ,
Oct 23, 2023 Oct 23, 2023

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Just to sum up the whole discussion, in case it's confusing:

 

  • The monitor profile needs to describe the actual and current behavior of the display.

 

The monitor profile is a map, used by Photoshop to map the document numbers into the display color space, so that they can be displayed correctly on screen. Like any map, it has to correspond to the actual terrain.

 

A calibrator makes a profile based on actual measurement. If you don't have a calibrator, you need to find a standard profile that describes the display as closely as possible.  That's why we're trying to figure out what kind of display the laptop has.

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Explorer ,
Oct 24, 2023 Oct 24, 2023

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hi, thanks for your answer. my monitor is  OLED touchscreen
3456 x 2160 (3.5K)

the complete data is

Dell XPS 15 9530
Intel Core i7 13700H / 2.4 GHz - vPro Essentials - Win 11 Pro - GeForce
RTX 4060 - 32 GB RAM - 1 TB SSD NVMe - 15.6" OLED touchscreen
3456 x 2160 (3.5K) - 802.11a/b/g/n/ac/ax (Wi-Fi 6E) - argento - con 1
anno di Dell ProSuppor

 

thanks a lot

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Community Expert ,
Oct 24, 2023 Oct 24, 2023

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LATEST
quote

Dell XPS 15 9530

By @alexander_P_999

 

According to a PC Magazine review, the gamut coverage of the Dell XPS 15 9530 was measured by the reviewer as:

sRGB: 100%

Adobe RGB: 97%

DCI-P3: 100%

 

If that review can be trusted, that indicates that the Dell XPS 15 9530 panel is natively P3 color gamut, so that might be the choice to start with. But also, look out for special modes that the Dell might offer, because if its display settings include, for example, a Vivid mode or a Gaming mode, or Night Light blue reduction in Windows, any of those could shift colors considerably and should be shut off. I do not know enough about the Dell XPS 15 9530 to know if it has any special display modes.

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