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Lens Profile - “Unable to locate a matching profile…”

Community Beginner ,
May 19, 2021 May 19, 2021

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(Note to Administrator: I posted this question originally in Photoshop forum on 5/19/21 at 10h00 PDT)

 

Hello to all. Could you help advise me how to adjust / overide this?

 

I'm trying to apply an AF Nikkor 28-105 f/3.5-4.5 lens profile to an image of a B&W silver gelatin print that I scanned as a TIF file using an Epson V500 flatbed. I took the photo using that lens on my Nikon F4s but when I bring up the TIF in LrC or Ps, the Nikon lens correction choices are a mere eight (8) lenses of what's normally available to me when I lens correct photos taken with my Nikon D810.

 

I assume LrC and PS read the EXIF data (LensInfo or LensModel?) from the TIF (Epson V500) or NEF (D810) files and offer the lens choices the programs think appropriate.

 

What approaches would you recommend so I could overide this to use the Adobe lens profiles normally available? Looking in my LrC catalog, I've got about 5800 photos with "Unknown Lens" that seem to have this problem. Is there a more elegant approach than the brute force "manual adjustment" one that I'm seemingly left with? 

 

I've use an old Mac Pro (mid-2010) running 10.14.6 Mojave, and Adobe CC (LrC 10.2, Ps 22.4, and Camera Raw 13.2). 

 

Thanks for your consideration.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
May 19, 2021 May 19, 2021

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You made a scan, but you want to apply a lens profile to the scan? Not going to work. You need to apply a lens profile to a raw you shot with that lens. Sorry if I'm misunderstanding your steps but no, there's no way to apply a AF Nikkor 28-105 f/3.5-4.5 lens profile to an image of a B&W silver gelatin print that you scanned as a TIF file using an Epson V500 flatbed. No reason to either. 

Author “Color Management for Photographers" & "Photoshop CC Color Management" (pluralsight.com)

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LEGEND ,
May 19, 2021 May 19, 2021

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As already alluded to, most lens profiles can be applied to raws only. However, you can easily make a copy of a lens profile that supports non-raws (e.g. TIFFs and JPEGs):

https://feedback.photoshop.com/conversations/camera-raw-and-dng/camera-rawlightroom-lens-profile-req... 

 

You'll likely get reasonable results only if the original print was uncropped.

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Community Beginner ,
May 19, 2021 May 19, 2021

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thedigitaldog, thanks for your reply.

and johnrellis, thanks for your reply as well as providing the link about Lens Profile Requests and Information. The discussion gave me useful background.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
May 20, 2021 May 20, 2021

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If the print was made from a negative shot with a AF Nikkor 28-105 f/3.5-4.5 lens you will need to apply that lens profile "manually."  Use the Profile dropdown selector and select AF Nikkor 28-105 f/3.5-4.5 entry. Since this is an analog film print the lens profile Vignetting correction will not be correct, but the Distortion correction should work. For the vignetting correction you can try moving the Vignetting control slider or use the Manual Vignetting settings with it set 0.

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Community Beginner ,
May 20, 2021 May 20, 2021

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@Todd Shaner @johnrellis @thedigitaldog @Jeff Arola 

Todd, thanks for your reply. I did shoot the negative with the AF Nikkor 28-105. FYI, I had posted this same request in the Photoshop forum and received an reply from Jeff Arola that helped me understand a bit more. Here's the link: https://community.adobe.com/t5/photoshop/lens-profile-quot-unable-to-locate-a-matching-profile-quot/... 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
May 20, 2021 May 20, 2021

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The suggestions made at the PS post are destructive edits, which require committing LrC edits and the lens profile corrections in a new TIFF file. For the large number of image files you need to edit LrC's non-destructiver workflow is a better choice. You need to create a non-raw version of the AF Nikkor 28-105 f/3.5-4.5 lens profile as John Ellis outlined and then manually apply it as I described. The distortion correction should be good as long as the image files haven't been cropped. Vignetting won't work well since you are using a print scanned image. In addition if the lens was set to different apertures and focal lengths the required vignetting correction will be different. There's no way to determine the shooting aperture or focal length so you'll need to adjust vignetting correction for each image file manually. With no lens profile correction applied many of the files will probably look acceptable.

 

If you have the original B&W negatives a better way is to use scannerless capture with a digital camera.

 

https://luminous-landscape.com/scannerless-digital-capture-and-processing-of-negative-film-photograp...

 

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Community Beginner ,
May 20, 2021 May 20, 2021

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Todd, you've brought up very good points to be aware of:

 

>The suggestions made at the PS post are destructive edits, which require committing LrC edits and the lens profile corrections in a new TIFF file. Yes, I agree. In my workflow, I use both LrC's non-destructive and Ps's destructive  (and sometimes non-destructive) editing capabilities. LrC to mainly to import, catalog, keyword, lens profile, and post my photos, and occasionally, Ps to refine and print them as images. As for the 5800 TIFs or JPGs images (of which 393 were flatbed scanned), I'll probably be highly selective of which ones get a lens correction treatment...

 

>For the large number of image files you need to edit LrC's non-destructiver workflow is a better choice. You need to create a non-raw version of the AF Nikkor 28-105 f/3.5-4.5 lens profile as John Ellis outlined and then manually apply it as I described. The distortion correction should be good as long as the image files haven't been cropped. Yes, I agree. John's suggestion of copying the 28-105.lcp file, changing the fields' values of 'stCamera:CameraRawProfile="True"' to "False", and storing it in my user's library is a viable approach to allow me to change the lens distortion.

 

>In addition if the lens was set to different apertures and focal lengths the required vignetting correction will be different. There's no way to determine the shooting aperture or focal length... Yes, that was one of my considerations against using the modified lcp profile as there's no EXIF focal length data in the TIF.

 

>If you have the original B&W negatives a better way is to use scannerless capture with a digital camera. Yes, I do have the negative, and I've switched from the flatbed to DSLR-scan my B&W negatives these days (see attached photo.)

 

My post's primary purpose was to learn if there were viable approaches to override / adjust the lens distortion of a single TIF that I'd scanned in 2020 so that I could output it as a JPG with a bit more "fidelity" to the original scene I saw. The 5800 files to fix question was contingent on approaches that would avoid brute force (and preserve the photos' integrity to the extents possible.)

 

The responses I've received to date have been quite helpful. Thanks to all.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
May 20, 2021 May 20, 2021

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Nice DSLR film copier setup!

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Community Beginner ,
May 20, 2021 May 20, 2021

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Todd, thanks. I wish I had found/read your article above about analog film to digital pixels years ago. I'd have had fewer flatbed scans to consider for lens correction.

 

Let me offer you and other "hybrid" photographers a useful 2010 article by Tim Vitale that was given to me this past March that helped me move primarily to DSLR film scanning. (See attachment.)

 

I'm not interested in starting a religious war between analog and digital photographers, but happily blend the two worlds as a "hybrid" photog, shooting Kodak Tmax 100 (B&W) with its claimed 200 lp/mm (which at full frame 35mm might be ~ 10,160ppi ~ 2.5µm/px or ~138.2Mp) and color photos with digital.

 

As my objectives are both to non-destructively preserve the original image but to also accurately render my prints for screen or paper given the still evolving A2D workflow, I'm now leaning toward ACR and Enhance Details, and Ps with its multiple layers as the better way to go for final output for now. In this case, lens correct for the analog, then lens correct for the digital scan.

 

It's all in the creation of art anyway. Thanks.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
May 21, 2021 May 21, 2021

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Interesting article. Here's a Dropbox link to the full Luminous Landscape article, companion PDF, and assests for testing the two processing wokflows (LrC/PS and Silverfast HDR). The article was written in 2014 before the Negative Lab Pro Lightroom plugin was created. I haven't tried it, but it appears to use a completely non-destructive workflow.

 

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/u5pnzbesvqen1hv/AABZyaWAn33jCwEinkT45iFAa?dl=0

 

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Community Beginner ,
May 21, 2021 May 21, 2021

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Thanks for graciously making your article and supporting documents available for download.

 

With regards to Nate Photographic's Negative Lab Pro (NLP) plugin for Lightroom, yes, I've been using it since 3/2021 for my DSLR-scans of analog photos and it is non-destructive. What's particularly useful for me is how NLP extends LrC's metadata capability so I can enter film-specific metadata (if I remembered to write it down at the capture time of course.) (See attachment).

 

If I'd taken the shot with a prime lens, my lens correction challenge that started this post would have been much easier. Ah well...

 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
May 22, 2021 May 22, 2021

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quote

 

If I'd taken the shot with a prime lens, my lens correction challenge that started this post would have been much easier. Ah well...

 


By @KEPhotoSEA

 

Most of my film shots were taken using Olympus OM2 cameras and Zuiko prime lenses. None of my captured film images taken with a film scanner or DSLR copy setup exhibit any significant vignetting or distortion. So yes prime lenses are much better in that respect, but not as good concerning other lens aberations (astigmatism, coma, chromatic aberration). Most of my Canon EOS digital camera lenses have better image quality and vignetting and distortion are fully correctable with LrC Lens profiles. Having said that the captured film images still look pretty darn good. See the Fujicolor Super G100 example at the below Dropbox link. That was shot with a Zuiko 28mm F2 prime lens, which was probably my best lens.

 

If Adobe would provide a true raw data invert function in LrC negative film could be processed without a plugin. You could then also create and use enhanced camera profiles designed for the characteristics of specific film types. First requested in 2012 (see below link), but nothing to date! Now that Negative Lab Pro is available it's unlikely Adobe will implement an invert function. As you point out NLP also has additional features for adding "as shot" camera and film data so a better overall solution!

 

https://www.dropbox.com/s/jmgxsmp3znf57b8/IMG_6426_Fuji%20Super%20G100_PS%20Workflow%20Example-DSLR%...

 

https://feedback.photoshop.com/conversations/lightroom-classic/lightroomcamera-raw-ability-to-invert...

 

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New Here ,
May 22, 2021 May 22, 2021

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I have suddenly lost my ability to apply a lens profile for my Canon 100-400 II. Last week it worked fine and now the option is not available for this lens under Canon?

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LEGEND ,
May 22, 2021 May 22, 2021

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Make sure you're editing a raw and not a JPEG, TIFF, or other non-raw. In Develop, type "i" until you see the name of the file in the upper-left info overlay. It's not uncommon for people to report here that there camera settings got reset somehow and they're accidentally editing a JPEG.

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New Here ,
May 23, 2021 May 23, 2021

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Thank you, your reason is correct, how settings got changed do not know! Thanks again.

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