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How to make image in ACR like image in PS. Looking for easy to follow method. Thanks.

Explorer ,
Jun 03, 2024 Jun 03, 2024

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Want to make image in ACR look like image in PS. Have latest versions of each one.  But an image in one, when sent to the other, has a different luminousity -- and maybe different colors.  Would appreciate an easy to follow method for accompliching this. Many thanks. Richard

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Community Expert ,
Jun 03, 2024 Jun 03, 2024

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That's either a defective monitor profile or a GPU driver bug (assuming you have HDR off in ACR).

 

Post a side by side screenshot.

 

Which calibrator are you using? What monitor model?

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Explorer ,
Jun 03, 2024 Jun 03, 2024

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Thank you for answering.

Using a datacolor spyder xprp on an imac 22" M1. 

Calibrate monthly.

Below are the 2 screen shots. 1.27.27 is in PS. 32.02 is in ACR.

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Community Expert ,
Jun 03, 2024 Jun 03, 2024

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Actually there is no significant difference in tonality or color. There is a very very slight difference in the deepest shadow values - not so much that you notice it, just enough to slightly alter the shape of the histogram. But I think there's a different explanation for that:

 

What I notice here is that they are at different zoom levels. One screenshot is a little larger than the other. That means the on-screen resampling is a little different, and that affects sharpness and noise.

 

Sharpness and noise can sometimes affect perception of tonality to various degrees.

 

View at 100% in both and check again. 100% is not about size - it means one image pixel is represented by exactly one physical screen pixel. Screen resampling algorithms are different between PS and ACR, but viewing at 100% takes that out of the equation.

 

I should probably add that I vewed this on an Eizo Coloredge monitor, and stacked the two images after having matched the size, so I could quickly flip.  I would have noticed any visible differences.

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Explorer ,
Jun 05, 2024 Jun 05, 2024

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Hi D Fosse,

Thank you for your comprehensive reply. The example I sent seems not to be very instructive. I'm going to look for a better one to send you. One question: should I be looking at both the images at 100? Richard

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Community Expert ,
Jun 05, 2024 Jun 05, 2024

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Yes, 100% is always best, so make the image small enough to fit on screen. Although with a noise-free image it shouldn't matter much.

 

Oh, and to be clear - make the screenshots from each individual application, but open and compare them in Photoshop. This is where you do the assign profile > convert.

 

You can use the same procedure for raw files. Just open them into Adobe RGB in Photoshop.

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Community Expert ,
Jun 06, 2024 Jun 06, 2024

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Ignore the last reply. I'm replying to two very similar threads at the same time, and this post was intended for the other thread 😉

 

The response in this thread is yes, view at 100%!

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