• Global community
    • Language:
      • Deutsch
      • English
      • Español
      • Français
      • Português
  • 日本語コミュニティ
    Dedicated community for Japanese speakers
  • 한국 커뮤니티
    Dedicated community for Korean speakers
Exit Search
0

Why are linked images in Photoshop and Illustrator blurrier than in InDesign?

Enthusiast ,
Dec 16, 2022 Dec 16, 2022

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Left to right:

2022-12-16_13-15.png

first: Illustrator, second: Photoshop, third: InDesign

The blurriest is the Photoshop linked image, it is noticeably blurred in full size compared to InDesign, and the Illustrator image is also a bit blurred.

I am using GPU pereformance and GPU preview in Illustrator and Photoshop, and in InDesign high quality display performance.

 

TOPICS
Windows

Views

177

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Expert ,
Dec 16, 2022 Dec 16, 2022

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

What happens if you select each of the linked images in InDesign, right-click, and select Display Performance > High Quality Display? Do you still notice the blurring?

Votes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Enthusiast ,
Dec 16, 2022 Dec 16, 2022

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Hi Myra, the blurring is in Photoshop, not in InDesign.

Votes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Expert ,
Dec 16, 2022 Dec 16, 2022

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Oh sorry. I misread your question. The quality setting for imported Photoshop & Illustrator images in InDesign is a question I've gotten before.

Votes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Guide ,
Dec 16, 2022 Dec 16, 2022

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

are you viewing the image at 1:1 or are you zoomed in/out?

Votes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Enthusiast ,
Dec 16, 2022 Dec 16, 2022

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

It's justified to available screen height, as you can see in the screenshot, they are the same size.

 

Votes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Enthusiast ,
Dec 16, 2022 Dec 16, 2022

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

This is a 128 MB image.

Votes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Guide ,
Dec 16, 2022 Dec 16, 2022

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

LATEST

in Ps, the only way to judge sharpness is at 1:1.

Votes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Expert ,
Dec 16, 2022 Dec 16, 2022

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Photoshop sharpness can only be judged at 100% zoom (i.e. Ctrl+1) not another zoom level that matches an arbitary screen size in another application. Anything else you are only viewing a preview of the image not the actual image pixels.

 

Dave

Votes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Enthusiast ,
Dec 16, 2022 Dec 16, 2022

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

But those conditions are the same in InDesign, isn't it? Yet in InDesign the image is sharp at the same scale.

Votes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Enthusiast ,
Dec 16, 2022 Dec 16, 2022

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Ctrl + 1 will yield a bigger "maximum" magnification  in Photoshop than in Illustrator and InDesign.

Votes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Expert ,
Dec 16, 2022 Dec 16, 2022

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

100% in Photoshop is not the same thing as in Illustrator or InDesign.

 

In Photoshop it means one image pixel represented by exactly one physical screen pixel.

 

In Illustrator/InDesign it's print size (at the specified screen resolution).

 

This is all different screen resampling algorithms, as long as you're not viewing 1:1 pixel.

Votes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines