Why are some pix in KB and others MB ? See screenshot

Participant ,
Mar 27, 2022 Mar 27, 2022

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Screen Shot 2022-03-27 at 1.15.10 PM.png

 I photoshopped all of these pictures. Some were "Save As" as I cropped them.

When I look at the pictures in PS they all they 300 dpi and are all huge files, no KB. Why does it look differently here?     Help please.  Thanks, Penni

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 27, 2022 Mar 27, 2022

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The file size  depends on the Image Quality you choose when saving.

Moving the slider to 12 will give your file a much larger size (6.1 MB) than 6 (1.5MB,  but will throw out a lot of the picture quality.

Screen Shot 2022-03-27 at 2.50.00 PM.png

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 27, 2022 Mar 27, 2022

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Hi Penni,

What version of Phtoshop are you using? Are you on a Mac--what OS are you on?

When you used Save As, what quality did you save them?

Michelle

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 27, 2022 Mar 27, 2022

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I don't do Mac, but are these small files shortcuts of a kind? What do the arrows signify? The file size looks like what you get from a thumbnail.

 

(just to be clear, "300ppi" doesn't mean it's a big file. A file can be one single pixel and 300 ppi. And as the others imply, jpeg compression level and image content are huge variables.)

 

 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 28, 2022 Mar 28, 2022

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If you're referring to the difference in file size reported by the Finder and Photoshop, this is perfectly normal.

The Finder reports compressed size on disk, while Photoshop reports the uncompressed size.

To open a jpg in any application, it has to be decompressed.

 

image_2022-03-28_105602.png

 

image_2022-03-28_105808.png

 

Some applications, like ACDSee, will report both file sizes.

 

image_2022-03-28_110339.png

 

 

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LEGEND ,
Mar 28, 2022 Mar 28, 2022

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Also, JPEG looks for repeated areas. A picture of the sky, all blue will make a much smaller file than a picture of gravel. There is no standard size.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 28, 2022 Mar 28, 2022

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Yes, image content has a huge influence on the file size of a jpg.

Busy, sharp detail (and noise) does not compress well, and will lead to a large file size.

Smooth, even (or out of focus) areas do compress well, and will lead to a small file size.

 

_dsf7592.jpg

2.72 mb

 

_dsf7710.jpg

447 kb

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