Welcome Dialog

Welcome to the Community!

We have a brand new look! Take a tour with us and explore the latest updates on Adobe Support Community.


Adding effects "AFTER" rendering timline

Community Beginner ,
Jun 25, 2021 Jun 25, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Hi, My problem is while I'm editing my videos together some of them are yellow barred but the playback is 

so bad that I can't see what I'm doing. So I render it, it works beautifully. But then my issue is that it "UNrenders" when I scale the clip, change the video duration, anything that isn't simply "cutting" the clip.

I can't seem to find this problem anywhere? I this not a problem? I'm stuck in this continuous loop of Render for 10 minutes, scale or make edit, Rerender for 10 minutes and its just costing alot of time. But I can't for the life of me find any solution anywhere to this problem/ So here's to hoping someone can help me here. 

TOPICS
Editing

Views

369

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines

correct answers 1 Correct answer

Adobe Community Professional , Jun 25, 2021 Jun 25, 2021
"Renderiing" only creates previews with the current effects included. As you've found, changing them means the previews no longer apply. There is another process ... render & replace ... which makes an entirely new full-res clip with every effect applied baked in. You set the format/codec for the operation. And then that clip is a full replacement for the clip used  on the timeline. You can 'restore unredered' to undo the operation. Neil

Likes

Translate

Translate
Advisor ,
Jun 25, 2021 Jun 25, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

try to get a handle on what happens in computer and edit program and adjust stuff to fit your machine.

some source material is hard to edit ( like h264 ) and larger dimensions ( bitrate and time ) influence time it takes to do stuff. 

proxies and cache settings ( and speed between cache drive and cpu, ram, etc.) have a big effect on time.

 

in editing you have to know some tech stuff just to solve problem like yours.

 

good luck

🙂

 

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Beginner ,
Jun 25, 2021 Jun 25, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I'll try, I'm a 3D modeler and I'm just slapping together a Showreel and my computer is clearly just not having a good time with all these clips. I just find it strange that I can render my timeline for 20 minutes, see something needs to be scaled, scale it, and it instantly reverts back, But if I need to cut the video and   move entire timelines around that doesn't cause it to revert back to it's pre rendered state. It just makes me think there's a way to work with the current green bar timeline instead of working on the yellow bar chugging timeline that won't really play. 

 

But I will take your advice and speed up my machine

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 25, 2021 Jun 25, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Sumeet explained the preview files nicely but maybe I can translate it into 3D if that helps. When you render the timeline you are essentially encoding a video file to your computer that is a snapshot of what your timeline looks like. Just like if you're working in your 3D package and you render you get to see the rendered version of what you're working on, but if you go back and make a change to your model it doesn't just update in your already rendered frame. You need to render it again to see the new updates.  

 

As suggested by salvo already, the media you work with can have a tremendous impact on performance. There are certain ways to optimize your media to make sure you have great performance while editing and that would be to make sure you use optimized codecs as your source media or to make proxies into an easy-to-read codec while editing. Think of working with proxies like working with a low-poly version of a high poly 3D model while you're animating. An animator doesn't need the full quality, high poly 3D model while they're trying to get their movement right, so they'll work with something that's easier to process and then swap in the high res one when they're ready to render the final version. It's the same thing with video media (although being difficult to play doesn't always go hand in hand with high quality.)  

 

Hope this was helpful.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Beginner ,
Jun 25, 2021 Jun 25, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

LATEST

That's amazingly helpful. I was having a tough time trying to wrap my mind around a bunch of new terminology and workflows in the course of the day. But I  have my footing thanks to your explanantion. I just wish the Maya Community was as fast and responsive as the forum here. 

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Employee ,
Jun 25, 2021 Jun 25, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Hi Andreas93,

 

Making changes to a sequence will require the timeline to be rendered again as the preview files which were rendered earlier won't have the new edit/effects applied. To ensure a better timeline performance, switch the Renderer to Mercury Playback Engine GPU Acceleration. Also, if you are working with h.264/h.265 files and have a supported system, you may enable H264/HEVC hardware accelerated decoding/encoding under Edit > Preferences > Media.

Hope it helps, let us know if you have any questions.

 

Thanks,

Sumeet

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 25, 2021 Jun 25, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

"Renderiing" only creates previews with the current effects included. As you've found, changing them means the previews no longer apply.

 

There is another process ... render & replace ... which makes an entirely new full-res clip with every effect applied baked in. You set the format/codec for the operation. And then that clip is a full replacement for the clip used  on the timeline. You can 'restore unredered' to undo the operation.

 

Neil

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Beginner ,
Jun 25, 2021 Jun 25, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Thank you Neil that's exactly what I'm looking for, I'll let you know if this works, however I ran into another wall pretty quickly which is ( Transcode failure.Unable to match frame Size) I'm going to try nesting the clips and then Render/Replace from there.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines