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Lumetric Color Correction

Enthusiast ,
Sep 23, 2022 Sep 23, 2022

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I cannot understand the importance of Lumetric Scopes panel because during the color correction you can correct a color while looking the still in the programe monitor & making adjustement in Lumetric Color panel. 

 

What are the advantages of Lumetric Scopes panel? 

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Adobe Employee ,
Sep 23, 2022 Sep 23, 2022

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Hi MahaB82A,

 

You may refer to this link to learn about the Lumetri scopes in Premiere Pro. Here is a video that discusses this in detail.

Hope it helps. Let us know if you have any questions.

 

Thanks,

Sumeet

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Community Expert ,
Sep 23, 2022 Sep 23, 2022

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The Mark I Eyeball is a great relative tool. But it is absolutely horrid at hard values.

 

For instance, you look at sky and start adjusting Blue. WRONG. Sky ain't blue, it's cyan, and often a LOT more green involved than you'd think. Same with grass ... it's mostly yellow, not green!

 

The Vectorscope can show you precisely where your hues lie in the image. For example, to check your neutrals, put a quick mask on the image so only a neutral area like gravel or sidewalk is visible, or a white or gray wall or car or whatever. And look at the Vectorscope.

 

If that 'trace' in the scope isn't centered, it shows exactly where you're off.

 

How can you tell if you are at 0, 4-5, or 10 by looking at a monitor? Especially, unless that monitor is fully calibrated with a professional application like Calman or ColourSpace and then PROFILED to check the calibration!

 

You can't.

 

But scopes will show you what your image is doing no matter how poorly the monitor is representing your image.

 

Working with scopes to set contrast, saturation, white/black points, to get neutrals truly neutral, fix color casts ... is both far more accurate and because it's hard data not guessing! ... is a ton faster.

 

I typically have the Waveform in YC no Chroma upper left quadrant, Vectorscope upper right, and RGB Parade across the bottom.

 

And ... I'm a "contributing author" over at MixingLight.com, a pro colorist's teaching subscription site. My "beat" is color correction/grading in Premiere for when pro colorists have to work in it rather than Resolve or Baselight. I've been 'connected' to the pro colorist community around the world for years.

 

Pros actually use expensive apps on separate monitors, often run by a secondary computer. They may have a large monitor with 5-8 scopes on it, or even two good-sized monitors both showing only scopes.

 

This is on top of that very expensive highly calibrated and profiled Grade 1 Refererence monitor ... and yes, that is a formal category with rigorous standards. No pro colorist ever trusts their eyes without scopes!

 

Neil

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Enthusiast ,
Sep 24, 2022 Sep 24, 2022

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Does this depend on the Colour Support of the monitor? There are monitors with Colour Support of 1.07 billion colours & 16.7 million colours etc. 

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Community Expert ,
Sep 24, 2022 Sep 24, 2022

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What matters is the color space the monitor is capable of providing.

 

Virtually all monitors have at least support for the sRGB primaries of Rec.709. Some can do the wider P3 color space, which realistically handles most anything in HDR at this time. So working in SDR/Rec.709 shouldn't be a problem.

 

Working in HDR either HLG or PQ ... could be on some monitors.

 

Neil

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Enthusiast ,
Sep 24, 2022 Sep 24, 2022

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Hues means color according to english dictionary. Why hue is used instead of color?.  Is there any specific meaning when hue used in Lumetric Scopes?

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Community Expert ,
Sep 24, 2022 Sep 24, 2022

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In video post work, Hue specifically refers to the combination of vector angle (on the vector scope, displaying essentially the colors of the color wheel) and distance from the center of the the scope (saturation).

 

So "hue" is the specific combination of vector angle and saturation.

 

Color is the color, or vector angle ... and can have any level of saturation.

 

Neil

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Enthusiast ,
Sep 24, 2022 Sep 24, 2022

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It is highly appreciated if you can upload a stills which show different between HUE & COLOR

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Community Expert ,
Sep 24, 2022 Sep 24, 2022

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As noted ... "color" is simply the location on the color wheel.

 

A "hue" is not only the location around the color wheel, but also the specific spot or distance between the center (no saturation, no color) and outside (100% saturation) of the Vectorscope.

 

A "Color" can have any saturation.

 

A "Hue" is a color at a specific saturation.

 

Neil

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