Highlighted

Pantone+ vs. Pantone Colors?

Community Beginner ,
Feb 28, 2016

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I just did a major upgrade going from snow leopard to el capitan and from CS3 to CC. In CS3, when I wanted to add a new color swatch I went to Swatches > New Color Swatch > Pantone Spot Coated. When I do that now, there are colors that I have used consistently in the past that are no longer showing in the list. In searching for answers, I am getting mixed results ranging from manually creating the pantone color I need to importing libraries from my old system. Some say to add, some say to delete the pantone+ and replace. I would appreciate any and all suggestions and feedback. Thanks!

Adobe Community Professional
Correct answer by rob_day | Adobe Community Professional

Fyi, 99.9% of my jobs are printed cmyk so I do convert all my spot color selections to cmyk.

If you use the Pantone+ spot libraries, the conversion to process CMYK will be color managed Lab-to-CMYK and that's the biggest difference in InDesignCS6 and later—the output values will depend on your color settings. So that can be an effective way of simulating the spot color if you have the correct printer or press profile and you understand how the Color Settings' color intent choices work. So if you don't want to get into the intricacies of color conversions and the job is going to a typical offset condition then you'll want to start using the pre-defined Bridge libraries.

583 is not a new color so it should be in the installed libraries. Try typing 583 plaus a space in the search field:

Screen Shot 2016-02-29 at 1.48.54 PM.png

The Pantone Color libraries work like plugins. The .acb files that are in your Swatch libraries folder show up in the Swatches panel. Here's my setup:

Screen+Shot+2015-12-08+at+1.08.34+PM.png

Topics

How to

Views

11.4K

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more

Pantone+ vs. Pantone Colors?

Community Beginner ,
Feb 28, 2016

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I just did a major upgrade going from snow leopard to el capitan and from CS3 to CC. In CS3, when I wanted to add a new color swatch I went to Swatches > New Color Swatch > Pantone Spot Coated. When I do that now, there are colors that I have used consistently in the past that are no longer showing in the list. In searching for answers, I am getting mixed results ranging from manually creating the pantone color I need to importing libraries from my old system. Some say to add, some say to delete the pantone+ and replace. I would appreciate any and all suggestions and feedback. Thanks!

Adobe Community Professional
Correct answer by rob_day | Adobe Community Professional

Fyi, 99.9% of my jobs are printed cmyk so I do convert all my spot color selections to cmyk.

If you use the Pantone+ spot libraries, the conversion to process CMYK will be color managed Lab-to-CMYK and that's the biggest difference in InDesignCS6 and later—the output values will depend on your color settings. So that can be an effective way of simulating the spot color if you have the correct printer or press profile and you understand how the Color Settings' color intent choices work. So if you don't want to get into the intricacies of color conversions and the job is going to a typical offset condition then you'll want to start using the pre-defined Bridge libraries.

583 is not a new color so it should be in the installed libraries. Try typing 583 plaus a space in the search field:

Screen Shot 2016-02-29 at 1.48.54 PM.png

The Pantone Color libraries work like plugins. The .acb files that are in your Swatch libraries folder show up in the Swatches panel. Here's my setup:

Screen+Shot+2015-12-08+at+1.08.34+PM.png

Topics

How to

Views

11.4K

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Adobe Community Professional ,
Feb 28, 2016

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

is this a photoshop question?

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Community Beginner ,
Feb 28, 2016

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

No. Did I post in the wrong forum? If so, I apologize. I have never put up a question before. This is for InDesign and Illustrator.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Adobe Community Professional ,
Feb 28, 2016

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

See if this Adobe Help article is useful:

Pantone Plus color libraries in Adobe Illustrator CS6 and CC

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Community Beginner ,
Feb 29, 2016

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Thanks Steve. I read through the article. I'm still not sure what my best solution is... are there cons to reinstalling the old library of pantone solid coated? Should I remove the pantone+ or just leave it? I would prefer to have both installed as the old library is missing the newer colors. In short, I feel like I'm way behind on some advancements. I have never had any issues with colors printing correctly. I read a little on the use of lab definitions but not sure I understand.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
LEGEND ,
Feb 29, 2016

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I have both libraries installed here without a problem...

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Adobe Community Professional ,
Feb 29, 2016

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I would check with your printer. The only reason to pick Pantone colors is to print spot colors on a press. (Otherwise you should be picking CMYK swatches instead.)

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Adobe Community Professional ,
Feb 29, 2016

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I read a little on the use of lab definitions but not sure I understand.

The new Pantone + libraries make a clearer distinction between actual spot output and process color simulations of the spot ink.

Now there are the Pantone + and Pantone + Color Bridge libraries. The Bridge CMYK libraries are pre-defined, process CMYK simulations of the solid inks and you could use those libraries for jobs that are always printing as process color and you don't want to make a color managed conversions in the workflow—you want to use Pantone's suggested CMYK simulation. If the job will be output as separate spot plates you want the Pantone + Solid ink Lab definitions because they produce a considerably more accurate screen preview.

The current libraries that ship with CC do not include the new 336 colors, but you can get them from Pantone via their Pantone manager software. Or you can get them from this Dropbox link which is much easier.

Dropbox - PMSacbLibraries.zip

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Community Beginner ,
Feb 29, 2016

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Ok, this is making more sense. So basically use the pantone+ when the color is available for a true cmyk definition, use the older library when the pantone color is not listed understanding it will be a simulation. Fyi, 99.9% of my jobs are printed cmyk so I do convert all my spot color selections to cmyk.

Having said that... what is the difference between the Pantone+ and the Pantone + Color Bridge Libraries (which I have never used). Maybe an example of what I'm trying to do will help. I want to use pantone 583. It is not listed in the Pantone+ solid coated... what are my options?

I really appreciate all the info. I have been in the business for 30+ years but as I am a "one man show" I do not have the benefits of networking with others who can help keep me up to date on changes/technology. I'm feeling like a nube right now. lol...

Rob... for the libraries I downloaded from the drop box... do I need to install all of them?

Thanks everyone!!!

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Adobe Community Professional ,
Feb 29, 2016

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Fyi, 99.9% of my jobs are printed cmyk so I do convert all my spot color selections to cmyk.

If you use the Pantone+ spot libraries, the conversion to process CMYK will be color managed Lab-to-CMYK and that's the biggest difference in InDesignCS6 and later—the output values will depend on your color settings. So that can be an effective way of simulating the spot color if you have the correct printer or press profile and you understand how the Color Settings' color intent choices work. So if you don't want to get into the intricacies of color conversions and the job is going to a typical offset condition then you'll want to start using the pre-defined Bridge libraries.

583 is not a new color so it should be in the installed libraries. Try typing 583 plaus a space in the search field:

Screen Shot 2016-02-29 at 1.48.54 PM.png

The Pantone Color libraries work like plugins. The .acb files that are in your Swatch libraries folder show up in the Swatches panel. Here's my setup:

Screen+Shot+2015-12-08+at+1.08.34+PM.png

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Community Beginner ,
Feb 29, 2016

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Feeling pretty silly right now... I should have just asked the 583 question first...   I added the space and my color came up. I will start using the Pantone+.

All in all, great answers and information. Thanks to all!!!

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Explorer ,
May 24, 2017

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Dear Rob,

PMSacbLibraries.zip is been missing at the dropbox, could you please upload again.

regards,

Vinoth

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Adobe Community Professional ,
May 25, 2017

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

The DB link wasn't mine.

Here's what I have for the latest:

http://www.zenodesign.com/forum/PANTONEPLUS.zip

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Explorer ,
May 25, 2017

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Dear Rob,

Thanks a ton.

Regards,

Vinoth

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
New Here ,
Dec 31, 2017

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

how do i load this files to indesign? i also have a lot of colors that missing from the catalog

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jan 01, 2018

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

See my #9. The .acb files go in your mouth Swatch Libraries folder

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
New Here ,
Jul 10, 2018

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Thank you for the info!! Very helpful!

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
New Here ,
Jun 13, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Dear Rob,

Thank you.  You're the real MVP!  Saved my behind trying to get that swatch I needed.  Thank you.

Thank you.

Best,

O

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
New Here ,
Apr 09, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

THANKS ROB >>2019 >>WORKED AWESOME THANK YOU

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
New Here ,
Apr 16, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Same, and I gave it a shot because I saw your 2019 post. Thank you!

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
New Here ,
Jul 30, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I would suggest moving from CS3 or CC to the latest Photoshop edition which would automatically update all the Pantone Libraries. Furthermore, the latest Photoshop edition will have few predefined colors, but not all the Pantone colors. To avoid the translation from CMYK to RGB you must use the Pantone Color Bridge Shade Card RGB to CMYK. This shade card also comes with the Pantone software that can be used to import the color bridge libraries in photoshop. Once you have this library installed from the color bridge, you will be able to access all the spot and process colors.

The Coated & Uncoated color bridge set is a multi-purpose tool which could solve your need. It is best used for determining how Solid Colors will look when reproduced through the four-color printing process, as well as a HTML value reference for digital media display intent. This two-guide set features all the 1,845 PANTONE MATCHING SYSTEM Colors, some of which are missing as per your question shown side-by-side with their four-color process printed equivalents on both coated and uncoated paper, enabling printers and designers to quickly determine how closely Solid Colors can be matched in CMYK along with the software to install the libraries in photoshop.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 30, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Once you have this library installed from the color bridge, you will be able to access all the spot and process colors.

Just to clarify, the PANTONE+ Color Bridge libraries are not defined as Spot colors, they are CMYK defined process color simulations of the solid inks. Because they are defined as CMYK their on screen appearance might change depending on the document’s assigned CMYK profile.

If you need to output Spot colors, you would use the PANTONE + Solid libraries and not the Bridge libraries. They are Spot colors with the color defined with device independent Lab values.

If you use either the Bridge or Solid swatches in Photoshop, the defined colors would get converted into the document’s color mode—if the mode is RGB, both the CMYK or Lab defined swatches would get converted to RGB, and with the CMYK Bridge swatches you would lose Pantone's CMYK definition.

To use the + Solid spot colors in Photoshop you have to make a separate Spot Channel for the solid color in order for it to output as a spot plate.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 01, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

arpanj8370114  wrote

I would suggest moving from CS3 or CC to the latest Photoshop edition which would automatically update all the Pantone Libraries. Furthermore, the latest Photoshop edition will have few predefined colors, but not all the Pantone colors. To avoid the translation from CMYK to RGB you must use the Pantone Color Bridge Shade Card RGB to CMYK. This shade card also comes with the Pantone software that can be used to import the color bridge libraries in photoshop. Once you have this library installed from the color bridge, you will be able to access all the spot and process colors.

The Coated & Uncoated color bridge set is a multi-purpose tool which could solve your need. It is best used for determining how Solid Colors will look when reproduced through the four-color printing process, as well as a HTML value reference for digital media display intent. This two-guide set features all the 1,845 PANTONE MATCHING SYSTEM Colors, some of which are missing as per your question shown side-by-side with their four-color process printed equivalents on both coated and uncoated paper, enabling printers and designers to quickly determine how closely Solid Colors can be matched in CMYK along with the software to install the libraries in photoshop.

This advice would only be correct if the company printing your work were printing to the exact same specifications that Pantone used to determine the CMYK builds in their 'Color Bridge' guides. They won't be. It's much more likely that they'll be printing to an industry standard like FOGRA39, in which case, if you want the closest CMYK match to Pantone solid, you use an ICC profile-based conversion.

Pantone has no business determining CMYK values, ever. The only useful function they have as a company is in defining spot colour ink formulas and their corresponding Lab values, for use only in spot colour print work.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 01, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

https://forums.adobe.com/people/Danny+Whitehead.  wrote

…Pantone has no business determining CMYK values, ever. The only useful function they have as a company is in defining spot colour ink formulas and their corresponding Lab values, for use only in spot colour print work.

Hi Danny,

hm, do you suspect that the given Lab values are not as accurate as they could be?

Regards,
Uwe

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 01, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

This advice would only be correct if the company printing your work were printing to the exact same specifications that Pantone used to determine the CMYK builds in their 'Color Bridge' guides.

Hi Danny, And there's enough randomness to the Bridge values that makes me think they are not color managed conversions from the measured solid ink Lab values, but seem to be subjectively arrived at builds—I don’t think there is any press profile standard behind the Bridge CMYK values.

It’s most noticeable with neutral colors. If Pantone used a standard press profile to make the Bridge conversions, we should be able to assign that profile and get an appearance match between the solid ink Lab colors and the CMYK Bridge colors.

If I assign the default US Web SWOP Coated, none of the Cool Gray swatches match, and Cool Gray 2 is a lighter value while Cool Gray 11 is a considerably darker value.

Screen Shot 5.png

I don’t get a match with any of the standard press profiles provided with CC:

Screen Shot 6.png

Screen Shot 8.png

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 01, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

hm, do you suspect that the given Lab values are not as accurate as they could be?

Hi Uwe, I don‘t think there‘s any reason to question the Lab values, Pantone is owned by Xrite, so one would think the solid ink readings came from a state of the art instrument. But there's plenty of reason to suspect the accuracy of the Bridge CMYK values because they are so inconsistent, and Pantone doesn't provide any information about the expected press conditions.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 01, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Laubender  wrote

hm, do you suspect that the given Lab values are not as accurate as they could be?

I've never used a spectro on a Pantone book to see what actual Lab values I get, but I have used a spectro with Pantone Colour Manager to read them, and they've always come up with the correct Pantone number, which I guess is a pretty good indicator of their accuracy.

But then there's substrate... how many jobs get printed on the same stock as Pantone books?

The solution is already happening: designers need to move on from the 'Pantone first' method of selecting brand colours! I've been mainly RGB-first for a few years now, but I wouldn't recommend it to designers that don't have a bit of an instinct for out-of-gamut colours.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Explorer ,
Sep 18, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

"I would suggest moving from CS3 or CC to the latest Photoshop edition which would automatically update all the Pantone Libraries."

 

While I agree on updating, especially from a very early CS3 version, Adobe has not updated the Pantone+ libraries it ships since 2010.

 

The latest Pantone Solid books are now up to version 4. Adobe still ships the original Pantone+ (v1) books with CC 2019.

 

Every time Pantone releases new colors — as they did with the infamous 336 pallette, then 180-something colors in 2015(?), and which they just did again this week with another 294 — they instruct users to download their Pantone Color Manager software and export new ACB files. 

 

And no, the newer books aren't compatible with the older books. The colors are book-specific. (if you pick a color from one book and give it to someone who doesn't have that book — even if it's an older, common color — they'll get "this file uses colors from a book you don't have installed" message.)

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Community Beginner ,
Aug 01, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Hello All!

I am the original poster - I'm surprised to see this become active again after two years. Just goes to show there is a lot of interest and ideas on how to manage colors.

First - thanks to those who suggested the space after the 583 = that worked!!!

Second - As a small business, I chose to self manage my colors. My main concern was for my biggest client. Their logo contained PMS 280 which was a solid blue. When the new definitions came along it went to a very dark navy. My solution, though maybe clumsy, works. I simply copy the logo into each new file, it shows up in the swatches and I am good to go.

One more comment - I have read a lot of people using lab colors. As a print business, I convert them to CMYK before the job goes to press. If you are submitting your job for four color printing, I would make sure the colors are converted by you to assure you are getting what you want.

Thanks for all the feedback.

Rhonda

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 01, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Their logo contained PMS 280 which was a solid blue. When the new definitions came along it went to a very dark navy. My solution, though maybe clumsy, works. I simply copy the logo into each new file, it shows up in the swatches and I am good to go.

I think this is a good example of why using Pantone's solid ink swatches as a reference for 4-color printing can be a problem.

The solid inks in Pantone‘s formula guides are not printed with CMYK process colors, they are custom mixed solid inks. That's the reason for the Lab definitions, is it is possible to use an instrument like a colorimeter to get an accurate color reading directly from the printed swatch. But, the accuracy of a displayed Lab color would depend on the accuracy of your monitor profile—to display a Lab color, InDesign or Photoshop has to convert the Lab values into your monitor’s RGB profile. If the monitor profile is not an accurate representation of your monitor calibration, then the Lab Pantone color could be off (or it might not be in the monitor‘s gamut).

Pantone 280 is out-of-gamut to most CMYK spaces—InDesign or Photoshop will show an out-of-gamut warning for the provided Lab values—and it's not really printable with any CMYK ink set. If the client cares about matching the color, the solid ink has to be run as a separate plate on press.

In the case of 280 neither a Bridge or converted CMYK color would match. Here the column on the left is a conversion from the Lab values to GRACol Coated. The out-of-gamut 280 doesn't match, but the other colors do because they are in GRACol‘s gamut:

Screen Shot 9.png

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Community Beginner ,
Aug 01, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

@ Rob - Interesting. The definition I have been using for PMS 280 for over 10 years is cmyk 100 | 72 | 0 | 18. My final product is a bright, vibrant blue (not dull like the cmyk shown in your attachment - it's more like the lab color shown). I think the gap between spot and cmyk printing has closed over the years as presses have become more sophisticated and accurate. What I have printed does match the colors in my pms books. If I was working for more corporate clients in a metro I would probably have to rethink my process.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 01, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I think the gap between spot and cmyk printing has closed over the years as presses have become more sophisticated and accurate.

I don’t think there's been much change in ink sets, CMYK still has a limited gamut relative to custom solid inks (think Pantone PurpleC).

Your 280 version is from the legacy Pantone solid library (which were all built CMYK definitions, not Lab) and if it is working for you that's great. But I don‘t think you could expect consistent results from any single set of device dependent CMYK formulas relative to the solid inks, because the color appearance of CMYK changes depending on the press profile.

The legacy 100|72|0|18 build does have better saturation, but is doesn't maintain the value of the Lab color. On my display the darker, saturated Lab value is a very close match to the printed solid ink in the Pantone book swatch.

Screen Shot 11.png

The color managed conversion to GRACol is trying to match the dark value so saturation is sacrificed.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 10, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

While the improvements in press control and colour management have helped standardise the CMYK gamut over the years, they haven't widened it. Gamuts have widened in toner-based digital print, but most DFEs/RIPs are set to mimic a press standard, so they don't really take advantage of it.

But as Rob suggested, if you're starting with Pantone's old CMYK builds as your target, you've a better chance of a match than you have trying the match the actual solid ink that's definitely out of any CMYK gamut.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Explorer ,
Sep 18, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

If you've been using the same CMYK definition of this particular swatch, is there a reason you can't just define the swatch in CMYK and leave it at that?

 

Because Pantone sometimes does make changes — like they did when the defaulted to using Lab instead of CMYK for their color definitions when they changed to Pantone+. Many, _many_ of our hues shifted, on screen and, for example, on laser printers. This caused a small bit of confusion as people who printed one color last week were getting a different one.

 

Pantone will also change the pigments used in their formulas. Per their formula guide, the base inks stay the same, but the pigments used to create those colors are now different. And yes, we found this out the hard way when a book that printed with a particular Pantone ink reprinted with that _same ink_ only instead of a neutral beige it came out pink. Lots of arguing with the printer about how they mixed the ink wrong, with their insisting they matched the chip, only to discover that our chip book was from the old, original Pantone book, while the updated Pantone+ book had a visibily different hue. Again, same color swatch, same formula, visibily different hue.

 

If you have a CMYK breakdown that's working for you, don't complicate the matter by referencing it to an ink that isn't in CMYK. Depending on who converts it and how you can get varriable results.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...