Using Photoshop CC on Macbook Pro retina

Community Beginner ,
Nov 04, 2013 Nov 04, 2013

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Hi, I am a web designer and I am trying to find a way forward in using Photoshop CC on my Macbook Pro (late 2013).  I have found posts that say you can open photoshop CS6 in "Low Resolution" however I cannot find the same option in Photoshop CC.  Zooming my design comps by 200% surely is not the answer.

Thanks for any advice anyone can give.

- Michael

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 18, 2022 Mar 18, 2022

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quote

 The days of designing at 1x should be over.


By @Dan Rodney

 

To paraphrase what someone else here said recently: there is a world outside web design.

 

100% = 1 image pixel to 1 physical screen pixel. That's the holy principle, the basic axiom, entirely independent from screen technology.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 18, 2022 Mar 18, 2022

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@D Fosse wrote:

To paraphrase what someone else here said recently: there is a world outside web design.

 

100% = 1 image pixel to 1 physical screen pixel. That's the holy principle, the basic axiom, entirely independent from screen technology.


 

That is precisely why a browser size preview command should be distinct from the 100% magnification command, in the same way that the View > Actual Size print command is. Because 100% has the specific meaning you described, that does not apply to what is really needed here.

 

Because there is a world outside print design, and it's a lot bigger world than print.

 

Ideally, just like print, you should be able to design at any magnification, then flip on the output size preview command, and it should probably have an option as to what device scaling factor you want to preview: 1x for legacy, 2x for most current computers and tablets, and 3x for phones that do use that scale factor.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 18, 2022 Mar 18, 2022

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Well...maybe...but I still don't agree. To be honest, I'm not wild about the Actual Size command either. It gives the impression that Photoshop actually works with physical sizes, which of course we all know it doesn't. It's confusing the issue. For serious print work, InDesign takes care of these things.

 

I can live with it for smart objects, because it's necessary for compatibility with Illustrator. But just barely 😉

 

I'm not concerned for all of us, who know how these things work. But people will misunderstand it, and from a pedagogical point of view, here in the forum, it just makes everything harder to explain.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 19, 2022 Mar 19, 2022

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@D Fosse wrote:

Well...maybe...but I still don't agree. To be honest, I'm not wild about the Actual Size command either. It gives the impression that Photoshop actually works with physical sizes, which of course we all know it doesn't. It's confusing the issue. For serious print work, InDesign takes care of these things.


 

Photoshop has worked with physical sizes since the beginning in the 1990s, when just about every image run through it was headed for print. Print is concerned only with physical sizes, measured in inches, not pixels. Even today, Photoshop is probably one of the most frequently used applications for printing photos, where the final size is a real world size on paper.

 

Because I print from Photoshop, I thought Actual Size was a great addition. It’s just too bad that Actual Size isn’t promoted and explained properly by Adobe, especially versus the older and confusingly named Print Size command (Print Size is really more like “manually corrected output size” for any media you like).

 

All this video and web stuff came later, and Photoshop has never quite adapted fully to these newer media that are now more prevalent than print.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 21, 2022 Mar 21, 2022

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Oh and REAL print design uses points and picas, not inches 😉

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 21, 2022 Mar 21, 2022

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Having a browser size command is not helpful. Just view at 200%. Done, and done.

But even that isn't really a solution, since you can scale your browser display (in Firefox its View->Zoom) so graphics and text are magnified. So "Browser Size" wouldn't even be correct.

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