Exported clip comes out overexposed and tinted blue

Community Beginner ,
Jul 23, 2022 Jul 23, 2022

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I'm trying to export my edited video that was recorded on a Sony A7III. My edits look perfectly fine the premiere preview window but when I export it get blown out highlights that also have a blue hue to them. 

I can't fingure out what's the cause of this.

I've attached an image to show what I mean. The left one is the exported clip and the right one is the premiere preview window. I'm completely lost as to how this is happening.

 

The only change I've made recently was in using the HLG color profile in the camera as opposed to cine4 but I can't imagine that would be the issue but I figured it's worth a mention.

TOPICS
Error or problem , Export

Views

53

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines

correct answers 1 Correct answer

Adobe Community Professional , Jul 23, 2022 Jul 23, 2022
Well, the HLG is actually the problem. If you're going to use HLG clips, a form of HDR, you have two choices. First, make sure your timeline color space is HLG, and your OS and monitor are set for HDR, and that any export is using an HLG/HDR preset. Or, easier, select the clips in the Project panel, right-click Modify/Interpret Footage and set the Override option to Rec.709. Make sure your timeline panel is Rec.709 and use regular export presets. Relatively few screens really do HDR yet,...

Likes

Translate

Translate
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 23, 2022 Jul 23, 2022

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Well, the HLG is actually the problem. If you're going to use HLG clips, a form of HDR, you have two choices.

 

First, make sure your timeline color space is HLG, and your OS and monitor are set for HDR, and that any export is using an HLG/HDR preset.

 

Or, easier, select the clips in the Project panel, right-click Modify/Interpret Footage and set the Override option to Rec.709.

 

Make sure your timeline panel is Rec.709 and use regular export presets.

 

Relatively few screens really do HDR yet, though that is changing over time.

 

Neil

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Beginner ,
Jul 23, 2022 Jul 23, 2022

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

So I have completed the edits and moved everything in place already. Is there any way to convert the clips in my timeline to Rec.709 or just export my project without having to replace all the clips??

 

Also should I no be using HLG at all then if I don't have an HDR monitor? The only reason I am using HLG is because I was watching a video by Gerald Undone comparing the color profiles available for the sony cameras. I am still very new to video editing and color grading in general.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Beginner ,
Jul 23, 2022 Jul 23, 2022

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Would you reccomend that I still use HLG but just convert it to Rec.709 everytime before I start my project?

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 24, 2022 Jul 24, 2022

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

LATEST

For now, yea, I typically recommend keeping things in Rec.709. I know a lot of colorists. And most of them have still not delivered a single HDR deliverable to a client.

 

Some of the colorists I know were the leaders in getting fully setup and certified DolbyVision HDR production qualifications. Which required ... two years ago ... $35,000 reference monitors. Now, it's down to only about $17,000 to $25,000 for a pro reference monitor.

 

An issue with the more typical consumer screens, both monitors and TVs, is that even if they say they're "HDR" ... most cannot sustain even 800 nits let alone the 1,000 that is the minimum for "pro" HDR work deliverables. And so they change screen brightness to match the scene.

 

If you're trying to grade on such a screen, you never know for certain how much of the brightness/darkness is from your actions, and how much is the screen.

 

So ... yea, we can't afford the pro reference monitor, right? But if your monitor can handle 100% of the P3 color space, and if it can sustain 500 nits, well ... then it's a lot of fun to work with HDR imaging. We can't know exactly what it's going to be like elsewhere, but ... it's still fun.

 

The SDR ... standard dynamic range of Rec.709 still covers most anything we do actually need to do, and covers what most screens can show. So it's more reliable and easier.

 

Neil

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines