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Pixilation or Compression Artifacts in Export

Community Beginner ,
Jun 14, 2021 Jun 14, 2021

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Hi fellow editors,

I have been testing video exports involving large .png source files.  Unfortunately this has resulted in painfully long render times and poor graphics results.  The test involved a cross-fade slideshow of these large static images, but while they all had the same dimensions (16150x9084), the larger datasize images (largest is 52.6MB) had an ugly flickering pixilization after being rendered into a .mpeg export.  

Before Flicker (still not great)

Screen Shot 2021-06-12 at 3.43.10 PM.png

During Flicker

Screen Shot 2021-06-12 at 3.42.03 PM.png

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I tried exporting with maximum quality and some other options but saw no improvement.  The rest of the project sequence I exported from does not suffer this issue.  I want to use .png becuse these images are actually broken into background layers and a foreground with transparency.  They are large because I intend to zoom in and pan over them without loosing resolution.  This may be a hardware limitation, my Macbook is by no means a high performace graphics engine, but please tell me if there is a fix to this beyond getting a new computer.  Just finishing the edits will be tedious due to slow computer processing so I am open to any advice that will make it easier on my mac.

 

Adobe Version: Premiere Pro CC 2020 v14.8

Computer: MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2017, Two Thunderbolt 3 ports)

Operating System: OS-X High Sierra 10.13.6

Processor: 2.3 GHz Intel Core i5

Memory: 8 GB 2133 MHz LPDDR3

Graphics: Intel Iris Plus Graphics 640 1536 MB

Screen Shot 2021-06-12 at 3.49.45 PM.png

TOPICS
Export, Formats, Hardware or GPU, Performance

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correct answers 2 Correct answers

Enthusiast , Jun 15, 2021 Jun 15, 2021
Hi,First read this about max still image dimension for PPRO.https://helpx.adobe.com/ca/premiere-pro/using/importing-still-images.htmlSecond, handle hudge amount of pixel like your images is putting a lot of pressure on your system.Export is a crucial part of the process since it can ruin your entire work, so you need to understand the basics of compression and most used format. Go for H264 for now and use presets like Youtube HD if you really don't know nothing about encoding formats.

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Community Beginner , Jul 06, 2021 Jul 06, 2021
Update:  Since it has been a number of days since I had a reply here, I did some digging into the topic of adjusting nest layer size myself.  This adobe-video.uservoice.com webpage gave me the clues I needed to get the results I was looking for.  Nest layer size can be adjusted manually with Sequence -> Sequence Settings, so I could make a nest as large as its contents dimensions.  I had to manually adjust the scale of each individual image in the nest as well, so the fact this webpage is reques...

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Enthusiast ,
Jun 15, 2021 Jun 15, 2021

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Hi, 

First, you should not use Match Sequence settings.

This is for a specific type of workflow.

As you can see, it uses MPEG preview and the quality won't be good.

Depending on the kind of zoom, i think you should downsize your images a little bit more (convert them ). Premiere can handle a certain amount of pixel for still images and I think you are very close to the limit point.

Can you tell us where this video is meant to be played ? Social media, Cinema, internal playback on computer ?

 

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Community Beginner ,
Jun 15, 2021 Jun 15, 2021

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Thank you for responding.  I have just a few concerns and questions about this.

Ultimately, the video needs to be in a format that is playable on my computer and uploadable to Youtube.  Matching sequence setings was the only way I got a decent playable output in a format I recognize.  Qucktime format produced files way too large and .mp4 is limited to super low resolution for some reason.  Fogive me for not recognising the other formats as anything playable, I have been learning Premiere on my own for over a year with a great deal of success on editing this project but I haven't figured out formating and this compression problem is an obsticle I need to ask about.   I am reluctant to dowsize the images, they seem to be at the ideal resoltion for zooming in on, but if 61.3MB (largest datasize image plus backround layers) is beyond what Premiere is designed to handle, I guess I have no choice.  What is the limit exactly?  I notice pixilization on some of the smaller images as well.

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Enthusiast ,
Jun 15, 2021 Jun 15, 2021

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Hi,

First read this about max still image dimension for PPRO.

https://helpx.adobe.com/ca/premiere-pro/using/importing-still-images.html

Second, handle hudge amount of pixel like your images is putting a lot of pressure on your system.

Export is a crucial part of the process since it can ruin your entire work, so you need to understand the basics of compression and most used format. Go for H264 for now and use presets like Youtube HD if you really don't know nothing about encoding formats.

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Community Beginner ,
Jun 20, 2021 Jun 20, 2021

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H264 format fixed the original pixilization problem and the export is playable.  Thank You.

 

Now I am testing zooming with the default scale tool availble in effect controls on a nested layer containing the slideshow.  I can zoom in but the high resolution of the original source image is not coming through.  Premiere appears to be scaling at the same resolution as the 100% scale preview without increasing it, so the result is pixilated.  Something to note, "%100 scale" is actually 11.9% according to the scale tool.  I tried using "Set To Frame Size" mentioned in the guide which didn't improve anything.  The .png size and dimensions are very large but well within what is allowable in Premiere (147Mpx < 256Mpx) so I have not resorted to dowsizing just yet.  Are there other methods of zooming in that work for this purpose.  

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 21, 2021 Jun 21, 2021

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I would suggest lowering your PNGs dimensions since you have to take 

into consideration that your system will be using "Software Only" rendering 

and encoding when going for H.264. set their sizes on Photoshop to something

close to 4K (preserve ratios). Import them back to premiere pro, do all the 

zooming and scaling in a sequence matching the png size, then nest that

sequence into a 1920x1080 sequence and scale it down to match the size,

export to H.264. If exporting to H.264 is too slow,

try going for QuickTime GoPro Cineform YUV 10 bits,

then create your H.264 out of the exported Cineform video.

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Community Beginner ,
Jun 25, 2021 Jun 25, 2021

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This seems to work for zooming in on individual image-clips in the nested sequence as they are already scaled to the png size, so I get what you mean.  I can do it individually this way but it might save me a great deal of difficulty if I could create an intermdiate nested sequnce with the png dimensions rather than the main sequence setting dimensions.  That would allow me to scale multiple clips and layers at once.  Can it be done?

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 29, 2021 Jun 29, 2021

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if you scale the sequence in which other sequences are nested, they will be scaled as well.. nested sequences follow the properties of the sequence they are nested in.

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Community Beginner ,
Jun 29, 2021 Jun 29, 2021

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Well, I think that's exactly my problem.  I can create an intermediate nested sequence that contains the images but it will be 1920x1080 like the outer nested sequnce and project settings.  That is probably what is causing the images to look pixilated when I scale to zoom in using the intermediate layer.  In order to zoom in and not lose resolution I would need a nested layer that has the same dimensions as the images it contains, which are larger than the outer nested squence and project settings to allow for said zooming.  Can this be done in Premiere?

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Community Beginner ,
Jul 06, 2021 Jul 06, 2021

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Update:  Since it has been a number of days since I had a reply here, I did some digging into the topic of adjusting nest layer size myself.  This adobe-video.uservoice.com webpage gave me the clues I needed to get the results I was looking for.  Nest layer size can be adjusted manually with Sequence -> Sequence Settings, so I could make a nest as large as its contents dimensions.  I had to manually adjust the scale of each individual image in the nest as well, so the fact this webpage is requesting an option to simplify the process in Prmiere is something for the developers to consider.  Having again tested the export of my sequence with the suggestions I recieved, I declare this inquiry case closed.

 

Thank you.

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