Premiere Pro and Multicore Support

Adobe Employee ,
Jun 11, 2019 Jun 11, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

People who say that Premiere Pro does not support multi-cores don't understand how multi-core support works. What you're asking about is optimization for high core counts, which is different.

 

Premiere uses multiple cores. Cores are independent CPU processors that can be assigned tasks. Premiere breaks this down with tasks for decoding codecs, applying CPU-driven effects, encoding to specific codecs, etc. Some of these threads may use a core more than other cores, and right now, an "optimal" number of cores is somewhere around the 8-12 mark.

 

The best analogy I can provide is to picture the checkout counters at a supermarket. Each checker is a "core". If there are a lot of customers, all the checkers are busy and lines form for each checker. However, if one customer has a full cart, still only one checker is used, and that lane slows down while other checkers sit empty.

 

To do optimization for high core counts, a task has to be split in an intelligent way so that multiple cores can tackle it. In my above analogy, it's like splitting up that big cart of groceries into 2 or more carts, so that more checkers can tackle ringing up the groceries.

 

How that split happens, and recombining the data afterwards, is something that coders need to tackle on a task-by-task basis. It's not simple nor easy.

 

Imagine my above example - it complicates how to manage the groceries - more carts means managing that. (ever tried to push two carts through a supermarket?) How are the groceries recombined into one cart after the checker is done? How to manage paying for the groceries when 4 checkers are ringing them up simultaneously?

 

It may sound silly, but these are real problems when you split up a task like video rendering. Do you send different frames to different cores? How do you ensure they're recombined in the correct order? How much time is wasted splitting the frames up to different cores? There are some tools that devs can use to automate some of this, but then there's a danger of making high core counts mandatory for optimal performance.

 

Some workflows started with high-core-count optimization in Premiere Pro, and moved to the GPU for better performance. RED workflows are a great example of this. The RED decoder would spin up multiple parallel processes and would use 16, 18, 24 cores as needed to decode/debayer RED r3d media. You can still see this by setting a RED project to "Software Only" in Project settings. But the GPU effectively has hundreds of cores, and does this task better.

 

So far, the Premiere Pro team has focused on high-core-count optimization for the GPU, and you'll see this in 13.1, particularly in how it renders to formats like H.264, HEVC, and more. Multiple GPUs are used more efficiently, including eGPUs, and there are speed gains in 13.1 because of it.

 

Now that high core counts are coming to the Mac platform, plus dedicated hardware for decoding ProRes files, we will have to wait and see what optimizations are in store for Premiere Pro on the Mac.

 

By Karl Soulé

Reprinted by permission

TOPICS
FAQ

Views

55.2K

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Explorer ,
Jun 11, 2019 Jun 11, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

https://www.pugetsystems.com/labs/articles/Premiere-Pro-CC-2019-CPU-Roundup-Intel-vs-AMD-vs-Mac-1320...

I dont see any advantage of using more than 8 cores. Are you sure that Premier Pro uses more than 8 cores?

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Employee ,
Jun 13, 2019 Jun 13, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Alur,

According to Puget Systems, you get around 98% efficiency with 8-12 cores - then efficiency begins to flatline a little. More cores are a bit better, but not noticeably so. Personally, I like overkill, so 10-14 cores is where I'd aim my personal workstation if I was building one.

Hope that helps,

Kevin

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Guide ,
Jun 24, 2019 Jun 24, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

@Kevin_Monahan from which version of PP was multi threaded support available?

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Guide ,
Jul 16, 2019 Jul 16, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Kevin,

Please clarify cores and threads for this discussion.

You can't buy 5 and 7 core hyperthreaded Intel processors (that would result in 10/14 threads), so I think that it's pretty clear that you do mean cores.

And, if you have 10 to 14 cores, most Intel CPUs would be giving us 20 to 28 threads. Microsoft generally sees threads, and not cores, so far as multi-threaded software runs.

So, are you saying that Premiere Pro 2019 (13.x) and its sweet spot of 8-12 cores is really saying 16 to 24 threads?

Thanks,

Jim

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Employee ,
Jul 16, 2019 Jul 16, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I'll see if I can get KarlSoule​ to respond.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Engaged ,
Sep 27, 2019 Sep 27, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Any update here?

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Mentor ,
Jun 25, 2019 Jun 25, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

nice article... love the analogy of supermarket...

would like to see it extended some...like how do you get all those shoppers (carts ) out the front door, move stuff from baskets to cars and get those cars home so packages can be stored in food cupboards for use later on ???

Southbridge (computing) - Wikipedia

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
New Here ,
May 02, 2020 May 02, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Thank u so much

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
New Here ,
May 02, 2020 May 02, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Ok. So I had an Intel 6 core processor and they all hit their max speed when exporting from Premiere. I upgraded to the Ryzen 3950x and my export times have not changed. The processor runs at roughly 25%. So are you saying that if I downgrade to the 12 core it will perform better?

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
New Here ,
May 05, 2020 May 05, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

You are a big company, you can solve it - so solve it.
To use the excuse that it is difficult to solve is just silly and provocative.
You need to prioritize this issue.
There are thousands of users with powerful multi-core CPUs with lots of power that are not utilized by Adobe's programs.
You will get incredibly positive response from users if you focus on speed and core utilization over new features in next updates - especially with the new CPUs currently being released.
Right now, it is becoming more and more annoying to have more and more powerful computers - which are well utilized by other software - while Adobe's programs only exploit a fraction of PC potential.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
May 05, 2020 May 05, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Yea, we all want more and want it now. There's a common comment included in your post that doesn't hang with reality though.

 

focus on speed and core utilization over new features in next updates

 

Let's see ... how many new features were there all through the 2019 cycle? That would be ... um ...the HueSat curves in Lumetri, some tweaks to the Essential Graphics operations ... um ... ProRes on PCs, and the Display Color Management switch.

 

Well, how about 2020 so far? ... AutoReframe ... oh, and HDR 10 metadata export options.

 

Not a long list, is it?

 

They intentionally slowed working on new features two cycles ago, when Patrick Palmer took over the video apps. His main effort has been working on bugs including ones that went back a generation of code or two, performance, and stability. The numbers for the majority of the user base are way up on those, which is the good news. The bad news is that many of the bugs and performance issues plaguing various small subsets of users are things they cannot replicate in-house. What you cannot see, you cannot fix.

 

Which is why they created their public beta program out of the CC app, to get more users into the development cycle on a wider range of gear/media/workflows than their engineering staff and "internal" beta people provided.

 

And as they are getting bugs out and stability up, they are working more on getting performance up. Including in the public beta, they have hardware encoding for H.264 using both Nvidia and AMD GPUs being tested among other performance items.

 

And the place to communicate directly to the development team is their UserVoice system. This forum is primarily user to user, with product support staff like Kevin Monahan who started this post doing supervision. The UserVoice site is the direct link to the developers. I've talked with one of the engineers tasked with reading every post, and he wants both more posts by users with problems and especially more detail in those posts.

 

Also ... every post on the UV system is collated and goes up to the upper managers who determine priorities and budgets. Those folk work, live, eat, and sleep Metrics. The UV system is the best way we users can give them the metrics we want them to see.

 

So ... feel encouraged to go search the UserVoice system for core-count posts, and upvote any you see. If you don't find a good one, make a new one, come back here and post the link, and I and others will happily go over an upvote it.

 

Neil

 

 

 

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Beginner ,
Jun 02, 2020 Jun 02, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

So I have an HP z420 and I got a Xeon e5-1680 8 core 16 thread for it.  Currently, it has the E5-1620 4 core base speed 3.7G and turbo 4GGz  Each core base speed is 3GHz and turbo 4Ghz with an EVGA GTX 1060 with 6g of ram.  It has 1260 Cuda cores. Once I install the 8 core I should see a more efficient performance boost with Premiere? I also have 64G ECC ram.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Beginner ,
Jun 20, 2020 Jun 20, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Okay, so we're asking for Adobe to invest in implementing optimization for high core counts. How can DaVinci and FCP utilize this, but not Adobe? I hear it's a long list, it's not that easy, etc. If this was prioritised to begin with from a managment stand point versus a "hey, let's wait and see where this goes" then you are left behind and criticised for the lack of priority. More features are great, but if you can't be good at the one basic thing the program was supposed to be good at then all the other features are putting lipstick on a pig. It's beautiful, but it's just bulky and slow.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 21, 2020 Jun 21, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

In case it's not been obvious enough ... over the last 18 months they haven't released hardly any new "features" other than upgraded performance with certain codecs & such ... working on performance/stability/bugs. That's been the main thing they've worked on, thankfully.

 

Neil 

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Beginner ,
Jun 22, 2020 Jun 22, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Neil - when your job involves using After Effects full time, now working with 4K+ media and deliverables, and you spend $8k on a 14-core computer to invest in your company to produce better work, more quickly - but realize there has been basically no gain in performance (in fact, my previous quad-core may have been faster) - it IS VERY frustrating.  It's not like people are asking for something that doesn't exist. Clearly others are implementing it.  

 

I love the whole suite of Adobe products and they've done a great job.  Yet, there's no excuse for not keeping up with the tech. 

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 22, 2020 Jun 22, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

A lot of things for the majority of users are faster. The H.264 encoding improvements are very impressive on a lot of gear.

 

And some things are freaking slower on some gear than they were before. Which is incredibly frustrating. Yea ... but true.

 

I know a number of folks with spendy new rigs that are flying in both Pr & Ae, but ... others aren't. Not because the developers haven't been putting effort into performance/stability/bugs, though ... but because they haven't got those gains out across the board yet.

 

No question, there's work to be done. Does your CC desktop app have the 'beta' tab on the left side? If so, please join in the public beta they started precisely to get after things like this.

 

And give that forum a detailed report of the failings of Premiere on your system. THAT board is monitored by engineers.

 

Neil

 

CC app Public Beta.PNG

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Beginner ,
Jun 22, 2020 Jun 22, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Thanks Neil - will do. 

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Beginner ,
Feb 10, 2021 Feb 10, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Hi Neil

 

First, i would like to say, that i am possitive that they FINALLY started on the bugs first, features later. But... the multi core issue is WAY longer than 18 months old. it was the same story 5 years ago. 

 

example, article from puget from 2015

https://www.pugetsystems.com/labs/articles/Adobe-Premiere-Pro-CC-Multi-Core-Performance-698/

 

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Feb 10, 2021 Feb 10, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Um ... yea, ya think? That's why the 'new guy' two years back brought in a guy to rebuild their development process to start going after things. Things that had been just ignored or back-burnered before.

 

Massive app but only so many people working on it. Used on an incredible array of hardware. They've made major progress, and that is helping a lot of people. Including mulit-core threading.

 

And there's still a fair number of users not getting major improvements ... which are the harder ones to track & solve 'cause they affect smaller & smaller segments of the user base, therefore harder to nail down what is the issue ... as it's harder for them to replicate.

 

I wish Adobe corporate would tumble out a bunch more cash for engineering. I also wish someone would just give me a beatiful Gibson L5-CES guitar, about a 1996 through 2008. I sure hope the former has a higher chance than the latter ...

 

Neil

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
New Here ,
May 05, 2022 May 05, 2022

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

If i buy the cpu ryzen threaddeeper pro 5995wx with 64 core and 128 thread, now, does premiere pro uses all 64 cores of this cpu, and will the rendering be faster than using 12900ks? Thanks for your reply

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
May 06, 2022 May 06, 2022

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

LATEST

Check with the folks at Puget Systems ... they have a ton of docs on their findings for various CPUs and Premiere, AfterEffects, Resolve, Nuke, whatever.

 

My 24 core 3960x uses all cores, and is a screaming macine with the newest Premiere. Some others aren't, and I haven't a clue why.

 

Neil

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines