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Possible to calibrate PPro Color Management to match CRT monitor?

Advocate ,
Apr 03, 2021 Apr 03, 2021

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I know, but I had just had to ask.

 

Trying to color grade so my bluray disk will look great on an HDTV.  You know, like the pros do.

 

I always see pics of pro editors, editing their big budget studio movies on computer flat screens.  They make great bluray discs, and they are not using CRT monitors.   How? Surely not with rec.709.

 

My computer monitor is calibrated at rec709, 2.4 gamma, but that doesn't mean squat when I export to bluray and the image is always brighter on the HDTV screen and never matches the timeline.  (and my hdtv is calibrated and looks great)

 

What's the point of rec709, when it really doesn't make the timeline match what is on the hdtv screen.

 

Is there a CRT calibration in x-rite?  or am I just dreaming.

 

Thanks,

Letty

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Editing, Hardware or GPU

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Advisor ,
Apr 03, 2021 Apr 03, 2021

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Could you show us a video or a picture of a TV show or movie being edit on one single computer screen? Keep in mind the editors don't usually create the Blu-ray discs. That being said why are you talking about CRT monitors if your goal is to output to an HDTV using Blu-ray discs? You sound very confused. Video professionals will use old school CRT TVs for monitoring the video capturing of VHS, 3/4" or even Betcam because the SD formats look horrible on HD TVs and computer screens.  Don't confuse video capture with video editing. As I stated already you need to invest in third party hardware. Your best bet is to create a 1080i sequence and burn a 1080i Blu-ray disc. You cannot see interlace video/sequences accurately using a computer screen. You have to invest in broadcast complaint hardware in order to achieve the What You See Is What You Get (WYSIWYG) method that you desire. I demonstrate this in the video below. I even suggested you watch the second half. You watched the first half. At the end of the day the solution to your probelm is not going to change even if you repost it 2359 times.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dVLUxRkPMdA

I use the Canopus ADVC 110 firewire DV converter and the Intensity Shuttle. Both products are discontinued. You must by them used. #firewiredvconverter #dvc...

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Advisor ,
Apr 03, 2021 Apr 03, 2021

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The Ultra Studio 4K mini can be hooked up to an old school 3/4" deck and allow you to monitor your video capture on an old school CRT monitor. That being said it can also allow you to edit to 4K monitors with ATSC 3.0 specs as well Digital Cinema Spces (DCI). Would you look at a CRT TV if you were editing for Digital Cinema? Would you look at a CRT TV if you were capturing 3/4" inch tapes?  Does it finally make sense? That being said the Ultra Studio 4K Mini is much better than the Intenisty Shuttle.

4K mini.jpg

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Advocate ,
Apr 10, 2021 Apr 10, 2021

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Impossible.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 10, 2021 Apr 10, 2021

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Pro colorists work on systems with i/o boxes between their computers and the Grade 1 Reference monitors they use ... high-end monitors from Flanders and Eizo especially. Around $5,000 and up for a full-on reference monitor for SDR and Rec.709.

 

And yes, they work their systems in very tight Rec.709 calibration and profiles. Their calibrations use a spectroradiaometer via Calman or ColourSpace software to create the LUT for their monitors. Those monitors store user-supplied calibration LUTs ... or they use a BlackMagic or AJA box to store the LUT and feed the monitor.

 

So yes, they do work in Rec.709 feeding a good signal to their b-cast spec reference monitor. They would never check by making a disc to feed a TV. Although quite often, they'll have a large-screen TV setup specifically for clients to sit and watch in the room with them. Often an LG, the C9 or Cx models. Which is also calibrated and 'fed' from a LUT box.

 

And will be very very close to their reference monitor.

 

My setup ... though not using the i/o box nor having a Flanders (oh how I wish ... ) still is capable of showing very good profile graphs after calibration. LightSpace, using Resolve for the patch generation, tells me me dE is well under the magic number of "not visually noticeable' and I've got a very good gamma chart and RGB response.

 

When I've had my stuff checked by my bosses (I produce tutorials on grading for 'when you HAVE to' in Premiere Pro for a pro colorist's subscription site) it's been spot-on. Which always gets an eye-roll from them because "just because you have this within specs doesn't mean it's a real working solution".

 

Well, yea, I know it ain't no Flanders. But if I got a full-on b-cast show to grade, you better believe I'd have a Flanders in here toot-suite.

 

Now ... if you're creating a BluRay and feeding a TV ... unless that TV is also fully calibrated ... you have two major places where you have no idea what the processing is doing to your signal: the BluRay authoring software and the TV itself.

 

And TVs are notoriously set too bright and saturated outta the factory.

 

Neil

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