Lightroom extremely slow on Mac

Community Beginner ,
Jul 16, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I am experiencing painfully slow performance of Lightroom Classic. It can take up to 12 seconds just to load a photo at times. I can't just quickly scroll through the photos in develop mode - if I don't wait a couple of seconds on each photo, then after about 5 or 6 photos, it just hangs for 8-10 seconds with the spinning wheel while Lightroom catches up. It takes 12 seconds to move from Develop to Library. If I am doing a lot of editing on a photo, it lags. It's like Lightroom can't keep up. I have 32 GB memory, 2.4GHz Intel Core i9 processor, Radeon Pro Vega 20 4GB, Intel UHD Graphics, and 1 TB of free disk space. I have tried it with both the GRU on and off with no real change. Any ideas or help would be appreciated.

nancyd36809937  wrote

I'm hoping that this is just that Lightroom hasn't yet caught up with cameras that now have bigger files and that this is something they will address.

This is a problem that has been reported repeatedly, new MAC, local adjustments, large images (45.7 MP), all of this puts lots of stress on your CPU — its not Lightroom that has to catch up, it is your hardware that can't keep up and you see lagging performance. A lot of people seem to think that new MACs are well configured for LR, but they generally are not well configured for LR.

Views

9.6K

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
This conversation has been locked.

Lightroom extremely slow on Mac

Community Beginner ,
Jul 16, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I am experiencing painfully slow performance of Lightroom Classic. It can take up to 12 seconds just to load a photo at times. I can't just quickly scroll through the photos in develop mode - if I don't wait a couple of seconds on each photo, then after about 5 or 6 photos, it just hangs for 8-10 seconds with the spinning wheel while Lightroom catches up. It takes 12 seconds to move from Develop to Library. If I am doing a lot of editing on a photo, it lags. It's like Lightroom can't keep up. I have 32 GB memory, 2.4GHz Intel Core i9 processor, Radeon Pro Vega 20 4GB, Intel UHD Graphics, and 1 TB of free disk space. I have tried it with both the GRU on and off with no real change. Any ideas or help would be appreciated.

nancyd36809937  wrote

I'm hoping that this is just that Lightroom hasn't yet caught up with cameras that now have bigger files and that this is something they will address.

This is a problem that has been reported repeatedly, new MAC, local adjustments, large images (45.7 MP), all of this puts lots of stress on your CPU — its not Lightroom that has to catch up, it is your hardware that can't keep up and you see lagging performance. A lot of people seem to think that new MACs are well configured for LR, but they generally are not well configured for LR.

Views

9.6K

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Jul 16, 2019 0
LEGEND ,
Jul 16, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

What is the size (in pixels, not inches) of your monitor?


Are you doing a lot of local adjustments (brushing, spot healing) on these photos?

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Jul 16, 2019 0
Community Beginner ,
Jul 16, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

It is 2560 x 1600 at 227 pixels per inch (15-inch retina display). I do use local adjustments...but lightroom should be able to handle that. The problem isn't only in editing, if I'm just clicking through the photos to quickly look to see if I want to do anything with them (without any adjustments yet), after several photos, it hangs. It's like lightroom can't keep up. I didn't used to notice this problem...it seems like it's something relatively new.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Jul 16, 2019 0
LEGEND ,
Jul 16, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Are you having this issue in the Develop Module, or the Library Module, or both, or somewhere else?

I do use local adjustments...but lightroom should be able to handle that.

If you do a lot, sometimes the CPU can't handle the workload in what seems like an instantaneous fashion, and so that is why Lightroom comes to a crawl.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Jul 16, 2019 0
Community Beginner ,
Jul 16, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I could understand if I am doing a lot and it started lagging...but it happens when just clicking on photos that are RAW and haven't been edited. If I don't click slowly and wait for each photo to come up and load, it's a problem. It's like lightroom can't handle the larger files of the Nikon Z7. It's more than frustrating - not sure if the larger file sizes are the problem, or if there is some setting that I need to adjust.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Jul 16, 2019 1
Community Beginner ,
Jul 16, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

It happens more in the develop module, but it has also happened in Library as well if I'm going quickly through the photos.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Jul 16, 2019 0
LEGEND ,
Jul 16, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Yes, 45.7 megapixel images will slow you down.

Can you try an experiment? Set the screen resolution to 1920x1080, and then take 10 new images, import them into Lightroom, and open them in the develop module see if the problem improves. If that works well, then do some editing but with no local adjustments and see how that works. If that works well, then do some local adjustments and see how the performance is.

When you do this experiment, after you import the photos, just let Lightroom sit by itself doing whatever it wants to do for 10 minutes so we can be sure that there are no previews being generated in the background. Also make sure to turn off all face detection and turn off all synchronizing with Lightroom CC. (Don't just assume these are off, don't say "I never use them" or "I never turn them on"; please check and verify that these are off).

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Jul 16, 2019 0
Community Beginner ,
Jul 16, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I'll try this tonight.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Jul 16, 2019 0
Community Beginner ,
Feb 12, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

why should that matter???? if youre doing a lot of local adjustments????!!!!

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Feb 12, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Feb 12, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

OK here is my (very) simple explanation-

You:  Brush one area.

Lr:  Brush one area.

You: Spot a dust.

Lr: Brush one area, Spot a dust.

You: Draw a gradient

Lr: Brush one area. Spot a dust. Draw a gradient.

You: Spot three dust spots.

Lr: Brush one area .Spot a dust. Draw a gradient. Spot a dust. Spot a dust. Spot a dust.

 

Get the drift?  Every time you apply a Local Adjustment, Lightroom has to record the step in the catalog then re-draw what you see on screen by (reading) re-applying EVERY step you ever did.

So many Local adjustments = many steps are repeated, thus slowness.

(And a Preference to Auto-save to Metadata is going to make that worse!)

Regards. My System: Lr-Classic 10.1, Photoshop 22.1, Lightroom 4.1, Windows-10 Nikon DSLR.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Feb 12, 2020 0
LEGEND ,
Feb 12, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

In addition to the comments by WobertC, the local adjustments are very CPU intensive, and if you have many on a single photo, this can cause quite a bit of slowdown. Slider adjustments, such as exposure or saturation, are much less CPU intensive, and you can do a lot of slider adjustments without noticing a slowdown.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Feb 12, 2020 0
Community Beginner ,
Feb 12, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Thank you for explaining what a "local adjustment" is

Can't we all just return to simplicity and call these EDITS???

Just like Adobe calls what was always known in photography as "spotting"
is now called "healing"

What are we healing???

We are spotting! Removing spots

I'm learning this crazy, hard, overly-complicated thing called Lightroom

With Apple Photos, (I needed no tutor) I figured it all out myself and did
beautiful editing. Indeed, Apple creates products that are yes, intuitive.
With a bit of tooling around, you start to get it.. Because they honor the
value of* Simplicity and Clarity*

My photos don't need much editing. I like it more natural. I'm not against
Photoshop (which I refuse to learn until I've learned Lightroom) which I
may never use or learn because that is really difficult designed for very
advanced tech types.. As it is, I have a tutor that's costing me a small
fortune I'd have to hire someone for an extended time to learn Photoshop!

This is Adobe. They have complicated their programs to the point of insanity

A photographer should not have to be a genius to figure out everything in
LightRoom

Even organizing the pictures is a nightmare. More should be built in

Cannot believe you are explaining that the very reason for using Lightroom,
to make one's photos the best they can be (a really good photograph should
not need that much tweaking unless you're turning the image into a fantasy
of the reality you shot.. which is fine no judgements here if that's what
you want to do with your image.. but even then.. you're saying that one
should should just *understand* that each time you make an edit or
adjustment *you are stressing the program, stressing your computer,
stressing it! *So don't complain how slow everything is becoming (or
crashing) and just accept it! Bite your nails with worry and anxiety that
Lightroom and Apple will not be able to handle all the stress from your
edits and adjustments!

Really??

Then let them both get to work on making their machines and their programs
run more seamlessly and smoothly, and collaboratively, since isn't that
what these products are supposed to do for the millions of photographers
out there using these products??

That's like saying: Well, don't drive this Honda like a Ferrari because *it's
not a Ferrari.. (*Well, then don't make people think they own a Ferrari
(Mac and Adobe) Tell them: Well, we are only a Honda and don't expect the
performance of a Ferrari from us (even though we tout our products to
perform as a Ferrari would!)

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Feb 12, 2020 1
Adobe Employee ,
Jul 16, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Hi nancyd,

That isn't a great user experience as Lightroom is running unexpectedly slow, we're sorry to hear about this.

Which version of Lightroom are you using?

As Lightroom is running slow, could you please try turning off the GPU option from Lightroom's preferences? Go to Lightroom > Preferences > Performance tab > Uncheck "Use Graphics Processor" > Restart Lightroom and let us know if it helps?

For more info and further troubleshooting refer Adobe Lightroom GPU Troubleshooting and FAQ

Let us know if that helps.

Thanks,

Akash

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Jul 16, 2019 0
New Here ,
May 03, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

The link doesn't work...

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
May 03, 2020 0
New Here ,
Jun 19, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I came to this forum because of the same issue--all of a sudden LR started showing the spinning wheel for ALL functions, it was very frustrating. I tried turning off the GPU and it took care of the problem. I'm very glad I saw this. Thank you!

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Jun 19, 2020 0
LEGEND ,
Jul 16, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

1. As your display is apparently sub 4K, the use of graphics card acceleration is probably of no value, and the best you can hope for is that enabling that option accomplishes nothing (as opposed to fouling things up)

2. As it apparently has issues in Library mode as well as Develop mode, Pushing up the Camera RAW CACHE probably will not improve your performance. Oh you might want to try that anyway.

INQUIRY, despite what I just said, what is your Camera RAW CACHE set to?

3. Is this issue for new as well as old images? If not for new ones, perhaps the library previews are corrupt? You might consider deleting them outside of LR, then restarting LR

Attached, a few  links to MAC OS performance tweaks

https://computers.tutsplus.com/tutorials/how-to-give-your-mac-a-performance-boost--mac-46271

https://www.macbookproslow.com/speed-up-quick-checklist/

LR Performance Issues - YouTube

Slow Mac: Why is My Mac Running Slow? | 17 Ways to Fix Your Slow MacBook, iMac or Mac Mini

https://photofocus.com/software/speed-up-your-lightroom-classic-catalog-on-fusion-drive-macs/

Tuning Mac OS X Performance

Why is my Mac so slow?: 6 ways to speed up your Mac - Business Insider

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Jul 16, 2019 0
Community Beginner ,
Jul 16, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

My Camera RAW Cache is 8GB. Thanks for the other mac suggestions - I'll take a look at them. This is a brand new Macbook Pro with a maximum configuration, but it's worth taking a look to see if something can be optimized. I'm hoping that this is just that Lightroom hasn't yet caught up with cameras that now have bigger files and that this is something they will address. I don't remember having this problem before and the only thing new is the camera...in fact, one of the reasons I got the new laptop is because I thought that maybe a stronger laptop would help...but it hasn't!

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Jul 16, 2019 0
LEGEND ,
Jul 16, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

nancyd36809937  wrote

My Camera RAW Cache is 8GB. Thanks for the other mac suggestions - I'll take a look at them. This is a brand new Macbook Pro with a maximum configuration, but it's worth taking a look to see if something can be optimized. I'm hoping that this is just that Lightroom hasn't yet caught up with cameras that now have bigger files and that this is something they will address. I don't remember having this problem before and the only thing new is the camera...in fact, one of the reasons I got the new laptop is because I thought that maybe a stronger laptop would help...but it hasn't!

You really need to up that Camera RAW CACHE limit.

Wont help everything. But go for more like 25GB if constrained, more if you have the space or your work calls for it.

10 Tips to Improve Lightroom's Speed and Performance Without Additional Hardware   (see item 2)

P.S. occasionally purge that CACHE.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Jul 16, 2019 0
Community Beginner ,
Jul 16, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I tried changing my screen resolution as suggested above with a few files, but it had no impact.

I changed my RAW Cache to 25GB and still no change.

The tips above are helpful. I'm now trying to pre-build the 1:1 previews - I am cautiously optimistic that this will help, as the previews are a large part of what lags and causes the spinning wheel. It's taking time to build them, but it will be worth it if it helps performance.

Thank you for the tips, we'll see if it helps!

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Jul 16, 2019 0
LEGEND ,
Jul 17, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

nancyd36809937  wrote

I'm hoping that this is just that Lightroom hasn't yet caught up with cameras that now have bigger files and that this is something they will address.

This is a problem that has been reported repeatedly, new MAC, local adjustments, large images (45.7 MP), all of this puts lots of stress on your CPU — its not Lightroom that has to catch up, it is your hardware that can't keep up and you see lagging performance. A lot of people seem to think that new MACs are well configured for LR, but they generally are not well configured for LR.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Jul 17, 2019 0
Community Beginner ,
Jul 17, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Well, pre-building the 1:1 previews didn't help. Either did any of the other items I tried. If the problem is that there is no Macbook Pro you can buy that can handle Lightroom with the Z7 files, then I guess I'll need to switch to another editing software, as I already invested in a top of the line laptop, and am not going to switch to a windows machine. I would respectfully disagree that it is a hardware problem...it's that Lightroom hasn't invested in optimizing to be able to more efficiently handle new, larger camera files. It's a shame that Lightroom isn't optimizing their software to be able to run on available hardware. Last night, I took an image and just used the combination of Photoshop, and Camera RAW, and purposely made lots and lots of changes using spot healing, cloning, the brush, etc, and it was no problem. There was no lag like what happens on a photo in Lightroom. So I believe they can fix this if they wanted to. I'll try other editing software to see if others work better. Thank you for all your help - I would have much prefered to be able to get Lightroom to work!!!

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Jul 17, 2019 0
LEGEND ,
Jul 17, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Larger files require more CPU time to process. A simple fact, not really Lightroom's fault, every software will have this issue.

Larger monitors require more CPU time to generate all the pixels when an adjustment is made. A simple fact, not really Lightroom's fault, every software will have this issue.

Lightroom's underlying architecture causes the CPU to work extremely hard, the more brushing you do, the more stress on the CPU and this lengthens the time it takes to complete the calculations, to the point where it lags. And so a faster CPU would help here, I don't know if it would help enough to eliminate the problem because I don't have 45.7MP photos. Some other software which have different underlying architecture and are pixel editors (like Photoshop) have really no lag when brushing, no matter how much brushing you do. This seems to be the one flaw in this architecture in Lightroom, which otherwise works extremely well, is that it doesn't scale well to large images with lots of brushing on large monitors.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Jul 17, 2019 0
LEGEND ,
Jul 16, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Oh, and in that link I provided:

10 Tips to Improve Lightroom's Speed and Performance Without Additional Hardware  (see part 4)

Look at your Standard Preview size.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Jul 16, 2019 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 17, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

For every Mac owner that complains about speed, you can find a PC owner with an extreme top of the line machine that can't believe how slow Lightroom is. You would be just as disappointed with a windows machine no matter how much money you spend and how much time you spend on speccing the whole thing out. This forum is full of this complaint and there is some validity to it. The reality is that Lightroom has real issues with doing lots of local adjustments on high MP files on high resolution displays regardless of the hardware. This is true for ANY current computer, even top of the line and configured well and is fundamental to how Lightroom's non-destructive raw engine actually works. Currently, brushing for example is not GPU accelerated and this leads to real slowdowns when you start doing that. This will undoubtedly change in the future but we are not there yet. MacBook Pros are rather well configured machines for Lightroom with very fast SSDs and memory architecture. The iMacs and iMac Pros less so because of the very high resolution displays coupled with not top of the line GPUs that really tax Lightroom's architecture.

I mainly shoot a Z7 nowadays and edit on a relatively recent MBP and it works really smoothly and very fast. I rarely do local brushing which is probably why it works so well for me. Even on my older year 2012 MBP it works OK. Certainly doesn't fly but I can edit Z7 files on it without getting frustrated.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Jul 17, 2019 2