Resetting In and Out points for clips in the project

Explorer ,
Nov 08, 2013 Nov 08, 2013

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I was under the assumption that clips in the project panel were master clips (original untrimmed with no effects) and that dragging them to the timeline creates new versions of the master clips as sub clips.

I have hundreds of clips in my project panel that retained the in and out points of a previous cut.  How do I reset this so that dragging these clips to the timeline adds the entire clips... not a trimmed version.  I can treat each clip individually and extend the in and out points but this is not something I want to do for hundreds of clips.

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correct answers 1 Correct answer

Contributor , Nov 09, 2013 Nov 09, 2013

Hey guys,

I'm not sure if this has been answered, because the thread is rather long, but you CAN reset in/out points for clips in the project. This was a feature in 7.0.1. To do this, you simply select the clips in the project panel and hit the shortcut key for clear in or out (Opt I/O) or clear in AND out (Opt X).

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LEGEND ,
Nov 08, 2013 Nov 08, 2013

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Take them all out of the Project Bin (Delete) then re ingest them as fresh instances.

Try making them all Offline then relinking.(May work...dont know till you try)

BTW clips in a project are only references to the source files.  Not Master Clips.

Clips in the timeline are also only references and not sub clips unless you told them to be "subclips".

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Explorer ,
Nov 08, 2013 Nov 08, 2013

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Sorry, I have my terminology wrong, but you understand my question. 

Isn't that also really dangerous advice?  Deleting clips from the Bin will delete all instances of them used in the timeline.

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LEGEND ,
Nov 08, 2013 Nov 08, 2013

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I thought you wanted them to be entire clips (ie source clips) in the Timeline not trimmed clips.

How about starting a new Project for this exercise then Import old Project into to it..

Other wise...you will just need to go thru all the Clips in Source Monitor and "Remove Marks"

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Explorer ,
Nov 08, 2013 Nov 08, 2013

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Yikes.  That was what I was afraid of. 

Why on earth would Premiere retain the in and out points in the Project Bin?  What benefit does this have?

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People's Champ ,
Nov 08, 2013 Nov 08, 2013

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i might be missing something, but I think I actually know the answer to that question.

If I have a one hour clip and I put it into the Source monitor, set an in and out point and drag to the timeline, then I can move the in and out points and get the next portion dragged over to the timeline.

Then after a few times, I might get sidetracked and want to do something else for a while.

If the in and out points disappeared, I would have trouble keeping track of what I had already dragged over.

I am not on my editing PC at the moment, but if you use match frame to put the clip back into the source monitor, doesn't it show the in and out points from your particular clip?

In any case, if you want the entire clip on a regular basis, each time you drag and drop a subclip, remember to reset the in and out points before you close the window it is in.

Or, for that matter, after the fact, just create a new bin and import them all into that bin. They should not have the in and out points marked since they are effectively new clips. You should be able to use them all the way you want.

artofzootography.com

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Explorer ,
Nov 08, 2013 Nov 08, 2013

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I see what you're saying Steven.  Double clicking the clip or using match frame brings the clip with the in out points to the Source Monitor.  It's not the in out points in the timeline thats my issue.  It's the in out points thats retained in the Project Bin.

I'm editing someone else's footage with a ton of long clips and each clip captures several moments.  The easiest way for me to know what material I'm working with is to drag the uncut clips to a timeline and watch it play.  Now because these clips are used elsewhere in the project in other timelines... I'm only getting trimmed versions and manually resetting all clips to it's full state.  Importing new instances of the same clip to the Project Bin just bloats the project which opens up another set of issues.  I was hoping there's an easier way to reset/delete in out points of clips in the Project Bin... but I also understand this functionality may not exist....

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People's Champ ,
Nov 08, 2013 Nov 08, 2013

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The easiest way for me to know what material I'm working with is to drag the uncut clips to a timeline and watch it play.

Umm. I hate to ask, but I must.

Why not just watch them in the Source monitor? You can play them all the way through. You are not restricted to the in/out points. The CTI starts at the beginning. Just hit Play and watch. It will play from the beginning to the end. And if you get to a point you like, back it up a bit and mark it as an in point.

What am I missing?

artofzootography.com

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Explorer ,
Nov 08, 2013 Nov 08, 2013

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The material is usually from live events spanning multiple cameras so there's a ton of footage to review, 3-4 hours from each camera sometimes.  I find it much more efficient to slap it all on a timeline and use the J,K,L keys to view it one after another without having to load the next clip when the current one ends.  If they're all on a timeline, I usually double or triple tap the L key and let it run fast.  I find this to be the most efficient way to thoroughly familiarize (or quickly run through) someone else's footage.

Viewing such large quantities of material on the Source Monitor requires you click on each clip one by one.  Tolerable for small projects, but not exactly what I want to do for hundreds of clips.  Going back to the original post, what I'm trying to avoid is individually treating each clip but I'm always open to adopting new workflows if it means better efficiency.

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Adobe Employee ,
Nov 08, 2013 Nov 08, 2013

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You can still use the Source Monitor: just drop all the clips into a working sequence, load that sequence into the Source Monitor, and JKL, I/O, and ,/. to your heart's content.

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People's Champ ,
Nov 08, 2013 Nov 08, 2013

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Mark,

I think the problem is that if he drops it into a working sequence, the clips only come into the sequence with the amount of media set by the in/out points.

I don't know of any way to do what he wants. It is always going to be one clip at a time in the Source Monitor, or trimmed clips in the Program Monitor. Rock and a hard place.

artofzootography.com

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Explorer ,
Nov 08, 2013 Nov 08, 2013

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Of course you can.  But that circles back to my orginal question.  How do I reset/delete the in and out points of all my clips in the Project Bin before I "drop all the clips into a working sequence"?

I don't want to be redundant but Premiere retains the in out point of a clip in the Project Bin from a previous edit/timeline and I just want to know if there's a simple way to reset it.

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People's Champ ,
Nov 08, 2013 Nov 08, 2013

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You realize you are working backwards from normal, right?

Most of us start with the long clips and make shorter ones. We don't need to go back to the full clip and watch it all again on a timeline.

I think you are just not going to get the answer you are looking for.

artofzootography.com

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LEGEND ,
Nov 08, 2013 Nov 08, 2013

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His question is legitimate and valid for his purpose.

Unfortunately the answer is no . ie No single simple reset.

Various Workarounds and new workflows is all you got.

Make a  Feature Request.

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Explorer ,
Nov 08, 2013 Nov 08, 2013

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We're going in circles.  I don't know the material given to me so I have to review them in its entirety (for the first time).

I'm waving the white flag on this one.  You're right Steven.  I'm not going to get an answer perhaps because I haven't presented the problem clearly.  But the simple answer is no such functionality exist.

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People's Champ ,
Nov 08, 2013 Nov 08, 2013

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You explained it just fine. Except for why you can't just dump it all in a new project and look at it there.

But no, the feature does not exist. It never ocurred to any of us that it should as far as I can tell.

artofzootography.com

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Explorer ,
Nov 08, 2013 Nov 08, 2013

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That's actually what I'm doing now... starting a new project and reimporting media.  More workflow hurdles but it at least saves me from going clip by clip.

I didn't know I wanted this feature until I ran into this issue.  Frankly I don't think this feature should exist either... but mainly because I don't think Premiere should retain edit information in the first place.  I'm strictly talking about media in the Project Bin, not media in the timeline.

Generally speaking, these small issues are magified when you scale the project.  I think this is where Premiere can use some improvement.

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People's Champ ,
Nov 09, 2013 Nov 09, 2013

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but mainly because I don't think Premiere should retain edit information in the first place.

I disagree. Because of the workflow that I use, I may go back to that clip a few times. And knowing where I left off is useful.

I don't know of any reason to put a clip in the timeline just to watch it. The concept that you presented that it is a hassle to have to click on each clip to watch it just doesn't tie in to any workflow I would ever use. Or anyone else should use after they have already made subclips.

I get what you are doing, but I want my in/out markers right where they are. Changing it would really mess with my workflow.

artofzootography.com

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New Here ,
Jun 28, 2022 Jun 28, 2022

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LATEST

For my purposes, I do a short version of a project, then a longer version. So I can see what's being asked here as beneficial.  I do my short version, then I need all the in/out points cleared so I can do the long version. I'm wondering if I just need to create two bins, and treat them as seprate projects.  For now, I have to reset each clip manually, that's time consuming for sure. 

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LEGEND ,
Nov 08, 2013 Nov 08, 2013

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Why on earth would Premiere retain the in and out points in the Project Bin?  What benefit does this have?

It has the benefit of displaying and locating any useage of the clip sections in the timeline. Any clip can have multiple uses and therefore could have multiple IN and Out points on same Clip.

The Drop down will show the editor the uses and by clicking on them...go to them.

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Explorer ,
Nov 08, 2013 Nov 08, 2013

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shootermz, Maybe I'm just dense but I still don't see why retaining the in out points of clips (in the Project Bin) benefits.  There's benefit in showing the number of use and where's it's being used but that functionality is unrelated to the in and out points.

On a side note, Thanks for introducing me to the dropdowns!  Never knew you could use it to navigate to the timeline in which it was used.

I'm going to accept there's no easy way to batch reset the in/out points of all my clips in the project bin.  Thanks for helping me understand (and learning new things in the process).  Cheers.

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LEGEND ,
Nov 08, 2013 Nov 08, 2013

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shootermz, Maybe I'm just dense but I still don't see why retaining the in out points of clips (in the Project Bin) benefits.  There's benefit in showing the number of use and where's it's being used but that functionality is unrelated to the in and out points.

They may be part of the coding for the location and useage functioning ..but logically...an editor is going to choose the best part(s)  of the action in the clip and not require to revisit the other part(s).

Personally I find it handy because its one of the ways I use when I do alternate edits ( TVC versions).  Best take and best part of the take will always be used again.

I guess Premiere considers it gives the editor a method to remove any Markers....just not in batch.

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Contributor ,
Nov 09, 2013 Nov 09, 2013

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Hey guys,

I'm not sure if this has been answered, because the thread is rather long, but you CAN reset in/out points for clips in the project. This was a feature in 7.0.1. To do this, you simply select the clips in the project panel and hit the shortcut key for clear in or out (Opt I/O) or clear in AND out (Opt X).

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Explorer ,
Nov 09, 2013 Nov 09, 2013

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Respectfully I disagree, but this is worth a discussion just to see if there's a better workflow somewhere in the middle.

I don't know of any reason to put a clip in the timeline just to watch it. The concept that you presented that it is a hassle to have to click on each clip to watch it just doesn't tie in to any workflow I would ever use. Or anyone else should use after they have already made subclips.

I don't want to beat a dead horse, but if this is the first time I'm looking at this footage, I want an efficient way of reviewing them.  I'm not talking about a handful of clips,  I'm talking about hundreds of clips from a full day live event spanning multiple cameras.  If you don't see the value in putting it all on a timeline to review it all at once at 2 or 3 times the playback, I can't help you.  Would that not be easier than loading clips on the Source Monitor one after another for hundreds and hundreds of clips?  Again, workflow efficiency becomes much more significant when you have to deal with larger projects.  Not a problem with 30s TVCs but becomes an issue for a Documentary series.

So I guess the right question to ask is... if production gives you 999 clips to edit and you don't know what's in it, how would you review it?  For me, I would put the FULL clips on a timeline and hyper scrub through them... that's my reason. 

I get what you are doing, but I want my in/out markers right where they are. Changing it would really mess with my workflow.

shooternz presented a very simple and clean way of going back to where you left off... from the dropdown menu on the icon telling you exactly which timeline(s) the clip was used.  In this sense you can go back to that clip as many times as you want and know exactly how you use it and where.  Simple and effective for your workflow.  No need to retain the in and out points.

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Explorer ,
Nov 09, 2013 Nov 09, 2013

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strypesinpost wrote:

Hey guys,

I'm not sure if this has been answered, because the thread is rather long, but you CAN reset in/out points for clips in the project. This was a feature in 7.0.1. To do this, you simply select the clips in the project panel and hit the shortcut key for clear in or out (Opt I/O) or clear in AND out (Opt X).

Holy shit.  THANK YOUUUUUU!

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