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Ae & Pr CUDA doesn't work

Community Beginner ,
Jun 24, 2020

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Windows 10

Intel i9 9900K (3,6 - 4,7 GHz)

MSI MEG z390 ACE

64 GB RAM DDR4

Nvidia GeForce GTX 670 (2gb, cuda support)

850 W

SSD (2)

 

Hello. Sorry in advance for possible mistakes in my english.

 

Adobe applications doesn't want to do the render using CUDA.

CUDA successfully worked for a long time, before the automatical upgrade of Creative Cloud and Windows. It happened few days ago.

No problems with GPU in the other programs and games.

While CUDA is turned off, the render is ok, but slower. I want to use GPU again. 

 

The problem:

1. AE and Pr let me to use CUDA. But while CUDA enabled in settings, there are artefacts in the viewports. 

2. Render error. 

 

1.jpg

I've seen related messages, but still can't solve this trouble.

I've downloaded latest drivers and reinstalled CUDA driver for my GPU; created cuda_supported_cards list. In the Nvidia Control panel 3d settings my GPU CUDA is turned on.

I usually use a lot of lumetri colour layers in AE  linked compositions, so I really need this acceleration.

Also I saw the opinion, that internal graphic core in the CPU may be the cause, but it's Intel, not AMD, which can work with this both technologies. My internal graphic core isn't active.

 

I'm going to buy a new GPU this year, but now afraid, that the problem may return with any of them.

 

If anybody can help or give some opinion, thanks.

 

 

 

In this case, with your 8-core/16-thread Intel CPU, then go with a GeForce RTX 2060S (2060 SUPER) or an RTX 2070S (2070 SUPER). For the latter, you'll be paying only a little more than what you originally paid for that GTX 670. And once you get to the 2060S/2070S point, the law of diminishing returns kicks in (as far as Adobe Creative Cloud application performance is concerned). Skip the 2080S and the 2080 Ti at this point since those higher-end GPUs really need more CPU horsepower than even your 4.8 GHz 8-core/16-thread CPU could manage just to become a worthwhile performance upgrade over the 2070S in Adobe apps.

 

At any rate, you do not want a GPU that is seriously underpowered for your CPU. Just like too much GPU getting choked by too little CPU, the opposite definitely holds true: An overpowered CPU gets choked by an underqualified GPU.

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Error or problem, Export, Hardware or GPU, How to

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Ae & Pr CUDA doesn't work

Community Beginner ,
Jun 24, 2020

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Windows 10

Intel i9 9900K (3,6 - 4,7 GHz)

MSI MEG z390 ACE

64 GB RAM DDR4

Nvidia GeForce GTX 670 (2gb, cuda support)

850 W

SSD (2)

 

Hello. Sorry in advance for possible mistakes in my english.

 

Adobe applications doesn't want to do the render using CUDA.

CUDA successfully worked for a long time, before the automatical upgrade of Creative Cloud and Windows. It happened few days ago.

No problems with GPU in the other programs and games.

While CUDA is turned off, the render is ok, but slower. I want to use GPU again. 

 

The problem:

1. AE and Pr let me to use CUDA. But while CUDA enabled in settings, there are artefacts in the viewports. 

2. Render error. 

 

1.jpg

I've seen related messages, but still can't solve this trouble.

I've downloaded latest drivers and reinstalled CUDA driver for my GPU; created cuda_supported_cards list. In the Nvidia Control panel 3d settings my GPU CUDA is turned on.

I usually use a lot of lumetri colour layers in AE  linked compositions, so I really need this acceleration.

Also I saw the opinion, that internal graphic core in the CPU may be the cause, but it's Intel, not AMD, which can work with this both technologies. My internal graphic core isn't active.

 

I'm going to buy a new GPU this year, but now afraid, that the problem may return with any of them.

 

If anybody can help or give some opinion, thanks.

 

 

 

In this case, with your 8-core/16-thread Intel CPU, then go with a GeForce RTX 2060S (2060 SUPER) or an RTX 2070S (2070 SUPER). For the latter, you'll be paying only a little more than what you originally paid for that GTX 670. And once you get to the 2060S/2070S point, the law of diminishing returns kicks in (as far as Adobe Creative Cloud application performance is concerned). Skip the 2080S and the 2080 Ti at this point since those higher-end GPUs really need more CPU horsepower than even your 4.8 GHz 8-core/16-thread CPU could manage just to become a worthwhile performance upgrade over the 2070S in Adobe apps.

 

At any rate, you do not want a GPU that is seriously underpowered for your CPU. Just like too much GPU getting choked by too little CPU, the opposite definitely holds true: An overpowered CPU gets choked by an underqualified GPU.

TOPICS
Error or problem, Export, Hardware or GPU, How to

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Jun 24, 2020 1
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 24, 2020

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Is that a Typo on your GPU:

Nvidia GeForce GTX 670 (2gb, cuda support)

 

That's way old! Why did you keep that one bit from the old computer. I can't wait to see RjL's comment on this one!

 

🙂

 

That card might meet the memory minimum (2gb) but the driver can't be updated sufficiently to use CUDA with PP2020. You need a new graphics card. Get a RTX 2060 or such.

https://helpx.adobe.com/premiere-pro/system-requirements.html

 

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Jun 24, 2020 2
Community Beginner ,
Jun 24, 2020

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Yea, it's a bit of my first workstation) 

So, it's time to find a new one.

Thanks 👍

 

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Jun 24, 2020 1
LEGEND ,
Jun 24, 2020

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In this case, with your 8-core/16-thread Intel CPU, then go with a GeForce RTX 2060S (2060 SUPER) or an RTX 2070S (2070 SUPER). For the latter, you'll be paying only a little more than what you originally paid for that GTX 670. And once you get to the 2060S/2070S point, the law of diminishing returns kicks in (as far as Adobe Creative Cloud application performance is concerned). Skip the 2080S and the 2080 Ti at this point since those higher-end GPUs really need more CPU horsepower than even your 4.8 GHz 8-core/16-thread CPU could manage just to become a worthwhile performance upgrade over the 2070S in Adobe apps.

 

At any rate, you do not want a GPU that is seriously underpowered for your CPU. Just like too much GPU getting choked by too little CPU, the opposite definitely holds true: An overpowered CPU gets choked by an underqualified GPU.

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Jun 24, 2020 2
Community Beginner ,
Jun 24, 2020

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Good idea, thanks.

GeForce RTX 2070S looks like an optimal choise.

 

 

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Jun 24, 2020 1
MyerPj LATEST
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 24, 2020

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Sounds like a good choice.

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Jun 24, 2020 1
LEGEND ,
Jun 24, 2020

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As MyerPj stated, that GTX 670 is long on the tooth. You see, although current Game Ready Drivers (446.14 the last time I checked) technically support desktop Kepler parts, the Kepler architecture itself has aged poorly, even when compared to the contemporaneous GCN architecture of the competing AMD Radeon HD 7000-series GPUs (derivatives of which continued to be used by AMD all the way up to and including the fairly recent Vega). And to demonstrate how poorly it has aged, even a GeForce GTX 1650S (aka 1650 SUPER) performs way better than that Kepler relic - and it costs just over $150 (compared to the $400 price that the GTX 670 sold for when it was new back in 2012).

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Jun 24, 2020 2
Community Beginner ,
Jun 24, 2020

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Thank you 👍

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Jun 24, 2020 1