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Resizing images for Premiere Pro maintaining quailty

Community Beginner ,
Sep 19, 2020

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I'm trying to ensure that still photos that need to be resized to be included in a Premiere Pro project are shown at the highest quality when the media is exported and shown. (My issue is reducing the size of the images rather than enlarging them) 

 

I'm aware of the "Scale to Frame Size" option but I gather this does not change the parameters of the original still even after rendering.   (This can cause some problems when it's time to export the media if your computer does not have enough grunt and the files are big).

 

Is the best way to ensure that the high quality in the original still is retained is to use "Scale to Frame Size" or should I use Photoshop  to reduce the size permanently?  Is 1080px high the right size for an HD wide screen video and should I make my own choice about DPI or go with the automatic resampling?   

 

And given the choice of output is a TIFF file better than a .jpg?

 

Hope someone can help

 

cheers

 

Allan

 

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Editing, Export, Formats

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Resizing images for Premiere Pro maintaining quailty

Community Beginner ,
Sep 19, 2020

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I'm trying to ensure that still photos that need to be resized to be included in a Premiere Pro project are shown at the highest quality when the media is exported and shown. (My issue is reducing the size of the images rather than enlarging them) 

 

I'm aware of the "Scale to Frame Size" option but I gather this does not change the parameters of the original still even after rendering.   (This can cause some problems when it's time to export the media if your computer does not have enough grunt and the files are big).

 

Is the best way to ensure that the high quality in the original still is retained is to use "Scale to Frame Size" or should I use Photoshop  to reduce the size permanently?  Is 1080px high the right size for an HD wide screen video and should I make my own choice about DPI or go with the automatic resampling?   

 

And given the choice of output is a TIFF file better than a .jpg?

 

Hope someone can help

 

cheers

 

Allan

 

TOPICS
Editing, Export, Formats

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Sep 19, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 19, 2020

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.tif or .jpg? Tiff is an lossless format, jpeg is 'lossy'. So jpeg will introduce compression artifacts when saving an image from Photoshop. Will this matter? Probably not, if you set 'high' or 'maximum' quality in the jpeg export settings. The advantge of jpeg? significantly smaller images ... but if you save them at high or max quality they will still be very close to the originals. But if you absolutely want the highest possible quality use Tiff (or PNG, or Photoshop format) when saving out of Photoshop but accept the much larger file size.

 

To get the highest quality on your video exports from Premiere Pro all you need to do is ensure the resolution of your saved images matches or exceeds your video resolution (i.e. 1920x1080). *preferably 'exceeds' (see below)

 

But unless you are having actual Premiere Pro export issues due to large image sizes, generally I would suggest leaving the images as they and scaling them to fit the frame in Premiere Pro. Once any higher resolution image is exported from Premiere Pro it will now have the resolution of your sequence (i.e. 1920x1080).

 

If you are having specific issues with Premiere Pro or your computer handling high resolution or large files, then yes you can resize them in Photoshop and perhaps save as jpeg. If I use this workflow I still tend to resave images out of Photoshop to something a bit bigger than video resolution (something around 3000 pixels wide) this still gives some room to change the framing of the images in Premiere Pro without losing quality.

 

If for example you save one of your images to 1920 pixels wide from Photoshop but then decide to scale that image slightly in Premiere Pro - say you went to 120% in the Premiere Pro effects scale controls. Now you are scaling an image beyond it's actual resolution. If you had started with an image that was (say) 3000 pixels wide and scaled it to 120% in a 1920x1080 sequence - you have not lost any resolution because you had more to work with in the first place.

 

Importantly - if you plan to resize an image to be larger within your sequence use 'set to Frame size' NOT 'scale to frame size'

 

Hope this helps.

 

 

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Sep 19, 2020 1
Community Beginner ,
Sep 20, 2020

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Thanks very much for your speedy and informative reply. It was very
helpful.

regards

Allan

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Sep 20, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 20, 2020

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Steve gave a great post. Especially note his comment about using Set To Framesize! I cannot think of a situation that I'd want "scale to" for.

 

He's also right about using either high-Q jpegs or tiffs. I just use jpegs. I do recommend sizing them from Photoshop to no more than 3 times the long dimension of the sequences they'll be used on. So for a 1920x1080, the 'short' dimension should be three times the same dimension of the sequence, horizontal or verticle.

 

That seems to allow for quite a bit of 'zoom' work in the sequence at good quality.

 

Neil

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Sep 20, 2020 1
Community Beginner ,
Sep 20, 2020

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Thanks for your follow up and helpful remarks. It's great to get such a
quick response.

cheers

Allan

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Sep 20, 2020 1