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Changing sequence settings causes oddities in multicam

Contributor ,
Apr 26, 2024 Apr 26, 2024

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24.5.0 x 21

So I'm doing a multicam edit with 4K footage. I did the normal multicam thing and am editing the composite clip just fine.

 

I decided that since my output is full HD, and the overlay graphics are 1080, I'd change the sequence settings down to HD, and make sure everything is "scale to fit."

 

That works for normal playback, but the preview cams in multicam editing are cropped to 1080, and don't show the scaled image.  I expected those to scale with the project.

 

I guess I'll go back to 4K for the sequence for now, but you may want to address this.

MisterAdvent_0-1714156423235.png

 

 

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7 Comments
Adobe Employee ,
Apr 29, 2024 Apr 29, 2024

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@MisterAdvent Yes, this is correct behavior.  Unfortunately, any effects on a Multi-Cam in a sequence are not passed through to the Program Monitor Multi-Camera View.  You'd see similar results if you added a Lumetri Color grade to the Multi-Cam clip in the timeline to make the clip Black & White - the Multi-Camera view would still display all angles in color.  In your case, enabling Scale to Frame Size is processed in a simliar way in that it is also a live effect on the clip, so it is not transposed onto the displayed Multi-Cam angles, despite the fact that the multi-camera angle rasters do crop to the resolution of the parent edit sequence.

 

There is some good reason for this.  For example, when creatively scaling a single multicam clip in the timeline, it's usually prefereable for that scale to not be applied when viewing the source angles in Multi-Camera View.  One would likely want to see the full content of the source angle they may intend to switch to, and then re-evaluate any creative scale applied, rather than having the scale from one angle enforced onto all angles when evaluating an angle switch. 

 

So... we just said we want to see the full sources... why crop the sources to the parent sequence raster, right?!  Well, the ability for Multi-Camera source angles to crop to the resolution of the containing sequence is important for (1) workflows where different angles of the same multicam were shot at different resolution, (2) workflows where Multi-Cam angles were deliberately shot wider than the target edit sequence for the center-cut workflows where that extra raster outside the frame is used for repos/stabilization, (3) situations where the delivery fromat and shooting format do not match, such as footage that was shot 16:9, but the final edit will be cut and delivered 1:1 for social media, or 2.35:1 for theatrical release.  This cropping behavior allows users to see where their source Multi-Cam angles will be cropped, identifying exactly what portion of their frame will be visible when switching to that angle in the sequence, prior to any repos or effects that may get applied later in the workflow.

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Contributor ,
Apr 30, 2024 Apr 30, 2024

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Thanks for the explanation.  I wrapped this project by keeping it at full resolution, then exporting at 1080.

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Contributor ,
May 01, 2024 May 01, 2024

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Thanks for the breakdown Ben, always wondered why the Multi-Camera View behaved this way.

 

For all the people working with 4K footage and delivering HD can I request you add a preference in the Program Monitor to disable this feature so we get the full raster. 4K>HD is a very common workflow and this would make life a lot easier.

 

Dan

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Adobe Employee ,
May 01, 2024 May 01, 2024

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@DJP2014 Noted, however...

4K>HD is a very common workflow and this would make life a lot easier.

I'm curious why this is a common workflow of choice - you mind elaborating further?

 

Why not:

  • Work at 4K and then scale down to HD on export?
  • Transcode your footage down to HD and then work in HD?

 

What is the benefit of working in two separate resolutions, both of which have the same aspect ratio, where the source footage is intended to be full raster within the smaller sequence?  I wouldn't recommend this unless there were specific workflow requirements.

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Contributor ,
May 02, 2024 May 02, 2024

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@Ben Insler 4K>HD gives me the option of repoing/scaling the shot, unlike the center-cut workflow though I still want to see the whole frame.

 

See people struggling with this a lot - https://community.adobe.com/t5/premiere-pro-discussions/editing-multicam-4k-footage-in-1080-sequence...

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Contributor ,
May 02, 2024 May 02, 2024

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I concur.  The 4K>HD workflow helps when recomposing and knowing when you've zoomed in too much. It also helps simplify export because you don't have to dial in any scaling.

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Adobe Employee ,
May 03, 2024 May 03, 2024

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@MisterAdvent @DJP2014 Appreciate the feedback.  Thank you!

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