Am i rendering the right way

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Sep 05, 2022 Sep 05, 2022

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I use after effects to render multiple videos for my educational website. i use lowerthirds for showing name of the tutor and the course in every couple minutes throughtout each video and each course has more than 10 videos of more than 20 mins length. Videos are usually in 720p or 1080p.

I also use a intro and outro video, each about 10 seconds long for each video. So each sessions comp has an intro and outro, and a lowerthirds being repeated multiple times. No heavy process is there in the comp. 

My renders for each 1080p video takes exactly as long as the whole video itself, and for 720p videosm, about 10 percent faster. I dont think this is normal. My specs are written below and i expect ae to render (using render queue) for mp4 (using aftercodecs) in original resolution in much shorter of a time. Is this normal?

 

Specs:

32 Gb RAM (3600)

VGA Radeon 5600XT

CPU Ryzen 7 5800X 4.3Ghz overclocked

AE 2022

 

AE settings are at default and only 3 Gb ram is dedicated to other apps.

 

I also have a question about rendering multiple comps. For each video, I have to use a different comp as the length and lowerthirds timings are different. Is there a way i could make render queue, or even media encoder, to make a list of all the comps, and then render them one by one without me having to adjust each video after the previous render is done?

Like i want to have the comps of for example 10 videos readied, and then ae would render them all on its own, maybe i could do my others works while its rendering.

Far as i have learnt AE, i cant have multiple comps open the way i mentioned.

Thanks in advance for your answers. Please let me know if any part of my question needs a clarification.

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Import and export , Performance

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Sep 05, 2022 Sep 05, 2022

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After Effects is a motion graphics and visual effects application designed to create shots you cannot create in an NLE. I would never use After Effects to edit a 20-minute video with lower thirds and an intro and outro. I might use AE to create a fancy intro and a fancy outro, but I would render them, add them to a Premiere Pro project, and do all of my editing and lower thirds in Premiere Pro. The total time you spend on each project will be dramatically reduced, and the render times will also improve.

 

If you resize a render in the Render Settings of the Render Queue or in the Media Encoder, you will not significantly change the render time because After Effects always looks at every pixel on every frame and then makes the calculations necessary to build a new frame. If you resize the comp during render, you just add another calculation. If you have HD footage and you resize the footage to fit in a smaller comp (720), you do not save any render time because every pixel in the original footage is still included in the calculations. 

 

Premiere Pro always renders faster than After Effects unless you include Dynamic Linked AE comps in the sequence. Rendering in less than real-time is extremely unusual for After Effects, and it only happens with very simple sequences in Premiere Pro.

 

I would render your intros and outros from AE using the High-Quality output module preset, then do the rest of the editing in Premiere Pro. There are lots of nice-looking lower-third presets, or you can create your own MOGRT for the graphics in After Effects using the Essential Graphics workspace.

 

I hope this helps. Most of my AE comps are one shot and less than 7 seconds. That is typical. More than one shot in a composition is very unusual.

 

 

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